VIDEO LOSS

a blog, newsletter, and kaleidoscope notebook about politics, the media, and culture
by tom bunting, a Real Journalist

Crisis In Our Backyards

  • How Craigslist Killed The Newspaper
  • Local News Consolidation: Explained
  • A Brief History of How The Internet Changed Journalism
  • How The City Is Covering New York As a Nonprofit
  • Inside The Battle For Better Local News
Statement from Iowa Democrats

Statement from Iowa Democrats

Learn How This Project Was Made

Statement from Iowa Democrats

Statement from Iowa Democrats

Statement from Iowa Democrats
March 14, 2019 12:55 PM
Politics

Just breaking:

“The integrity of the results is paramount. We have experienced a delay due to quality checks and the fact that the IDP is reporting out three data sets for the first time. What we know right now around 25% of the precincts have reported, and early data indicates turnout is on pace for 2016.”

No ETA on results. Surprising to see turnout is on pace with 2016, since many were expecting higher. Low turnout likely hurts Sanders. Maybe helps moderate candidates.

Surprisingly, the statement makes no mention of the reported issues around the app being used to log caucus results. Ruby Cramer at Buzzfeed says that campaigns are currently being briefed by state party representatives on a “technical issue” delaying results.

David Plouffe just said on MSNBC that “we may be seeing the last Iowa Caucuses” that are first on the primary calendar. This is not a good look for the state party.

Statement from Iowa Democrats

Just breaking:

“The integrity of the results is paramount. We have experienced a delay due to quality checks and the fact that the IDP is reporting out three data sets for the first time. What we know right now around 25% of the precincts have reported, and early data indicates turnout is on pace for 2016.”

No ETA on results. Surprising to see turnout is on pace with 2016, since many were expecting higher. Low turnout likely hurts Sanders. Maybe helps moderate candidates.

Surprisingly, the statement makes no mention of the reported issues around the app being used to log caucus results. Ruby Cramer at Buzzfeed says that campaigns are currently being briefed by state party representatives on a “technical issue” delaying results.

David Plouffe just said on MSNBC that “we may be seeing the last Iowa Caucuses” that are first on the primary calendar. This is not a good look for the state party.

Statement from Iowa Democrats

Just breaking:

“The integrity of the results is paramount. We have experienced a delay due to quality checks and the fact that the IDP is reporting out three data sets for the first time. What we know right now around 25% of the precincts have reported, and early data indicates turnout is on pace for 2016.”

No ETA on results. Surprising to see turnout is on pace with 2016, since many were expecting higher. Low turnout likely hurts Sanders. Maybe helps moderate candidates.

Surprisingly, the statement makes no mention of the reported issues around the app being used to log caucus results. Ruby Cramer at Buzzfeed says that campaigns are currently being briefed by state party representatives on a “technical issue” delaying results.

David Plouffe just said on MSNBC that “we may be seeing the last Iowa Caucuses” that are first on the primary calendar. This is not a good look for the state party.

Ah, maybe it’s a fucking app

Ah, maybe it’s a fucking app

Learn How This Project Was Made

Ah, maybe it’s a fucking app

Ah, maybe it’s a fucking app

Ah, maybe it’s a fucking app
March 14, 2019 7:13 PM
Culture

From Tyler Pager of Bloomberg:

“One precinct chair just told me had still hasn’t been able to report his results because the phoneme app is not working and he’s been on hold for the call hotline for more than 30 minutes.”

The state party is using a new app to tally the results from different caucus sites, which apparently has been eating shit today. The party told Bloomberg earlier today that the issues would be resolved, but it seems like they haven’t. What a mess.

Ah, maybe it’s a fucking app

From Tyler Pager of Bloomberg:

“One precinct chair just told me had still hasn’t been able to report his results because the phoneme app is not working and he’s been on hold for the call hotline for more than 30 minutes.”

The state party is using a new app to tally the results from different caucus sites, which apparently has been eating shit today. The party told Bloomberg earlier today that the issues would be resolved, but it seems like they haven’t. What a mess.

Ah, maybe it’s a fucking app

From Tyler Pager of Bloomberg:

“One precinct chair just told me had still hasn’t been able to report his results because the phoneme app is not working and he’s been on hold for the call hotline for more than 30 minutes.”

The state party is using a new app to tally the results from different caucus sites, which apparently has been eating shit today. The party told Bloomberg earlier today that the issues would be resolved, but it seems like they haven’t. What a mess.

A CONSPIRACY? (Probably not.)

A CONSPIRACY? (Probably not.)

Learn How This Project Was Made

A CONSPIRACY? (Probably not.)

A CONSPIRACY? (Probably not.)

A CONSPIRACY? (Probably not.)
March 14, 2019 12:55 PM
Politics

In the absence of any real data, we are seeing folks on the left and from Trump’s campaign insinuate that something fishy is going on. You may remember that there was widespread criticism around how the state party counted the results in the 2016 primary.

Until we know what’s going on, I think this is premature, although I understand why those on the left would be suspicious of anything being done by state parties. The Trump people, of course, are just trying to provoke Democrats into a civil war. It’s cheap.

On the cable news front, Wolf Blitzer is officially bored and angry. “Something must be going on,” he said as CNN came out of a break.

Four years ago, we had 90% of results in. Obama began his victory speech around 11pm eight years ago, or under an hour from now. We’ve still got nothing.

A CONSPIRACY? (Probably not.)

In the absence of any real data, we are seeing folks on the left and from Trump’s campaign insinuate that something fishy is going on. You may remember that there was widespread criticism around how the state party counted the results in the 2016 primary.

Until we know what’s going on, I think this is premature, although I understand why those on the left would be suspicious of anything being done by state parties. The Trump people, of course, are just trying to provoke Democrats into a civil war. It’s cheap.

On the cable news front, Wolf Blitzer is officially bored and angry. “Something must be going on,” he said as CNN came out of a break.

Four years ago, we had 90% of results in. Obama began his victory speech around 11pm eight years ago, or under an hour from now. We’ve still got nothing.

A CONSPIRACY? (Probably not.)

In the absence of any real data, we are seeing folks on the left and from Trump’s campaign insinuate that something fishy is going on. You may remember that there was widespread criticism around how the state party counted the results in the 2016 primary.

Until we know what’s going on, I think this is premature, although I understand why those on the left would be suspicious of anything being done by state parties. The Trump people, of course, are just trying to provoke Democrats into a civil war. It’s cheap.

On the cable news front, Wolf Blitzer is officially bored and angry. “Something must be going on,” he said as CNN came out of a break.

Four years ago, we had 90% of results in. Obama began his victory speech around 11pm eight years ago, or under an hour from now. We’ve still got nothing.

A holding pattern...

A holding pattern...

Learn How This Project Was Made

A holding pattern...

A holding pattern...

A holding pattern...
March 14, 2019 12:55 PM
Politics

We’re well over two hours into the Iowa caucuses and have not received any official results from the state party. For comparison sakes, in 2016 we had the majority of results in by now. In 2008, the highest turnout in history, the press was just about to declare Obama the winner at this point.

It’s weird. The state party is saying that they are taking the extra time to do “quality control” on the results, which makes sense considering the barely healed wounds over the way the party counted votes in the Hillary-Sanders caucus four years ago. But...they haven’t been transparent about what measures they are taking. CNN is now asking if something is wrong, a sentiment I’ve also seen expressed on Twitter.

Until I get some real data, all I know is the scattered results I’ve been seeing from people on the ground at individual caucus sites. From what I’ve gathered: Sanders and Buttigeg (especially) are performing quite well, and Biden is not. Again, though, there are over 1600 caucus sites in Iowa, and scattered results handwritten on pieces of paper don’t say much.

Results should come in any minute now, or things are going to get seriously weird. Until then, I’ll be watching cable news hosts attempt to fill time, a truly horrible experience for all involved. Stay tuned.

A holding pattern...

We’re well over two hours into the Iowa caucuses and have not received any official results from the state party. For comparison sakes, in 2016 we had the majority of results in by now. In 2008, the highest turnout in history, the press was just about to declare Obama the winner at this point.

It’s weird. The state party is saying that they are taking the extra time to do “quality control” on the results, which makes sense considering the barely healed wounds over the way the party counted votes in the Hillary-Sanders caucus four years ago. But...they haven’t been transparent about what measures they are taking. CNN is now asking if something is wrong, a sentiment I’ve also seen expressed on Twitter.

Until I get some real data, all I know is the scattered results I’ve been seeing from people on the ground at individual caucus sites. From what I’ve gathered: Sanders and Buttigeg (especially) are performing quite well, and Biden is not. Again, though, there are over 1600 caucus sites in Iowa, and scattered results handwritten on pieces of paper don’t say much.

Results should come in any minute now, or things are going to get seriously weird. Until then, I’ll be watching cable news hosts attempt to fill time, a truly horrible experience for all involved. Stay tuned.

A holding pattern...

We’re well over two hours into the Iowa caucuses and have not received any official results from the state party. For comparison sakes, in 2016 we had the majority of results in by now. In 2008, the highest turnout in history, the press was just about to declare Obama the winner at this point.

It’s weird. The state party is saying that they are taking the extra time to do “quality control” on the results, which makes sense considering the barely healed wounds over the way the party counted votes in the Hillary-Sanders caucus four years ago. But...they haven’t been transparent about what measures they are taking. CNN is now asking if something is wrong, a sentiment I’ve also seen expressed on Twitter.

Until I get some real data, all I know is the scattered results I’ve been seeing from people on the ground at individual caucus sites. From what I’ve gathered: Sanders and Buttigeg (especially) are performing quite well, and Biden is not. Again, though, there are over 1600 caucus sites in Iowa, and scattered results handwritten on pieces of paper don’t say much.

Results should come in any minute now, or things are going to get seriously weird. Until then, I’ll be watching cable news hosts attempt to fill time, a truly horrible experience for all involved. Stay tuned.

CNN’s Early Caucus Leaders

CNN’s Early Caucus Leaders

Learn How This Project Was Made

CNN’s Early Caucus Leaders

CNN’s Early Caucus Leaders

CNN’s Early Caucus Leaders
March 14, 2019 12:55 PM
Politics

CNN is reporting that the early leaders according to their Entrance Poll are Biden, Buttigieg, Sanders, and Warren.

Now, you may say “duh”. But this result is an early indication that there will be no dark horse surge for Klobuchar or Yang. Excepted, yes, but it is good to know with some amount of certainty.

CNN’s Early Caucus Leaders

CNN is reporting that the early leaders according to their Entrance Poll are Biden, Buttigieg, Sanders, and Warren.

Now, you may say “duh”. But this result is an early indication that there will be no dark horse surge for Klobuchar or Yang. Excepted, yes, but it is good to know with some amount of certainty.

CNN’s Early Caucus Leaders

CNN is reporting that the early leaders according to their Entrance Poll are Biden, Buttigieg, Sanders, and Warren.

Now, you may say “duh”. But this result is an early indication that there will be no dark horse surge for Klobuchar or Yang. Excepted, yes, but it is good to know with some amount of certainty.

The leaked (and unreleased) Register/CNN final poll

The leaked (and unreleased) Register/CNN final poll

Learn How This Project Was Made

The leaked (and unreleased) Register/CNN final poll

The leaked (and unreleased) Register/CNN final poll

The leaked (and unreleased) Register/CNN final poll
March 14, 2019 7:13 PM
Media

Via Claire Malone, confirming reports circulating around Twitter over the last 24 hours:

  1. Sanders 22%
  2. Warren 18%
  3. Buttigieg 16%
  4. Biden 13%

This is the most respected Iowa poll, but it’s still only one poll, so treat it with a massive grain of salt. That said: this could be a real bad night for Biden.

The leaked (and unreleased) Register/CNN final poll

Via Claire Malone, confirming reports circulating around Twitter over the last 24 hours:

  1. Sanders 22%
  2. Warren 18%
  3. Buttigieg 16%
  4. Biden 13%

This is the most respected Iowa poll, but it’s still only one poll, so treat it with a massive grain of salt. That said: this could be a real bad night for Biden.

The leaked (and unreleased) Register/CNN final poll

Via Claire Malone, confirming reports circulating around Twitter over the last 24 hours:

  1. Sanders 22%
  2. Warren 18%
  3. Buttigieg 16%
  4. Biden 13%

This is the most respected Iowa poll, but it’s still only one poll, so treat it with a massive grain of salt. That said: this could be a real bad night for Biden.

IOWA DIARY: The worst case scenario for Biden

IOWA DIARY: The worst case scenario for Biden

Learn How This Project Was Made

IOWA DIARY: The worst case scenario for Biden

IOWA DIARY: The worst case scenario for Biden

IOWA DIARY: The worst case scenario for Biden
March 14, 2019 12:55 PM
Politics

The worst case scenario for Joe Biden tonight is a fourth place finish. Biden’s allies will attempt to spin it as unreflective of his actual abilities, but it will severely diminish his electability appeal, which is basically his main selling point to voters.

And every bit of hesitation among voters chips away at his fire-wall in the South, which is significantly weaker than Clinton’s in 2016 and more akin to Clinton’s in 2008, which (partially) fell to Obama after his win in Iowa.

IOWA DIARY: The worst case scenario for Biden

The worst case scenario for Joe Biden tonight is a fourth place finish. Biden’s allies will attempt to spin it as unreflective of his actual abilities, but it will severely diminish his electability appeal, which is basically his main selling point to voters.

And every bit of hesitation among voters chips away at his fire-wall in the South, which is significantly weaker than Clinton’s in 2016 and more akin to Clinton’s in 2008, which (partially) fell to Obama after his win in Iowa.

IOWA DIARY: The worst case scenario for Biden

The worst case scenario for Joe Biden tonight is a fourth place finish. Biden’s allies will attempt to spin it as unreflective of his actual abilities, but it will severely diminish his electability appeal, which is basically his main selling point to voters.

And every bit of hesitation among voters chips away at his fire-wall in the South, which is significantly weaker than Clinton’s in 2016 and more akin to Clinton’s in 2008, which (partially) fell to Obama after his win in Iowa.

Richard Plepler and Josh Tyrangiel May Revive Their HBO Act for Apple

Richard Plepler and Josh Tyrangiel May Revive Their HBO Act for Apple

Richard Plepler and Josh Tyrangiel May Revive Their HBO Act for Apple

Richard Plepler and Josh Tyrangiel May Revive Their HBO Act for Apple
By John Koblin/NY Times
March 14, 2019 7:13 PM
Media
This could be a very big deal depending on the scale of the deal. Most streaming services have avoided current events coverage. An obvious question: would journalists feel comfortable working for a mega-tech company like Apple?
Richard Plepler and Josh Tyrangiel May Revive Their HBO Act for Apple

Welp, they tried!

Institutions cannot save Democrats.

Welp, they tried!

Learn How This Project Was Made

Institutions cannot save Democrats.

Institutions cannot save Democrats.

Welp, they tried!

Institutions cannot save Democrats.

Welp, they tried!

Welp, they tried!
March 14, 2019 12:55 PM
Politics
Welp, they tried!
Welp, they tried!

First impressions of Scroll, an ad-blocker with a conscience

A new service for circumventing ads shows promise, yet is hampered with limitations

First impressions of Scroll, an ad-blocker with a conscience

Learn How This Project Was Made

A new service for circumventing ads shows promise, yet is hampered with limitations

A new service for circumventing ads shows promise, yet is hampered with limitations

First impressions of Scroll, an ad-blocker with a conscience

A new service for circumventing ads shows promise, yet is hampered with limitations

First impressions of Scroll, an ad-blocker with a conscience

First impressions of Scroll, an ad-blocker with a conscience
March 14, 2019 7:13 PM
Media
First impressions of Scroll, an ad-blocker with a conscience
First impressions of Scroll, an ad-blocker with a conscience

Ben Smith of BuzzFeed Named New York Times Media Columnist

Ben Smith of BuzzFeed Named New York Times Media Columnist

Ben Smith of BuzzFeed Named New York Times Media Columnist

Ben Smith of BuzzFeed Named New York Times Media Columnist
By Mihir Zaveri/New York Times
March 14, 2019 7:13 PM
Media
Smith built Buzzfeed News into a journalistic force against the expectations of most in the mainstream press. It’s quite stunning to see him leave right before the 2020 election.
Ben Smith of BuzzFeed Named New York Times Media Columnist
Ben Smith of BuzzFeed Named New York Times Media Columnist

Trump May Skip Debates, or Seek New Host, if Process Isn’t ‘Fair’

Trump May Skip Debates, or Seek New Host, if Process Isn’t ‘Fair’

Trump May Skip Debates, or Seek New Host, if Process Isn’t ‘Fair’

Trump May Skip Debates, or Seek New Host, if Process Isn’t ‘Fair’
By Maggie Haberman and Annie Karni/NY Times
March 14, 2019 7:13 PM
Media
A grim possibility: a 2020 election with no debates.
Why a Joe Rogan Endorsement Could Help (or Backfire on) Bernie Sanders

Why a Joe Rogan Endorsement Could Help (or Backfire on) Bernie Sanders

Why a Joe Rogan Endorsement Could Help (or Backfire on) Bernie Sanders

Why a Joe Rogan Endorsement Could Help (or Backfire on) Bernie Sanders
March 14, 2019 12:55 PM
Politics
Why a Joe Rogan Endorsement Could Help (or Backfire on) Bernie Sanders
Why a Joe Rogan Endorsement Could Help (or Backfire on) Bernie Sanders

Warren camp warns of 'breathless media narratives' out of Iowa

Warren camp warns of 'breathless media narratives' out of Iowa

Warren camp warns of 'breathless media narratives' out of Iowa

Warren camp warns of 'breathless media narratives' out of Iowa
/Politico
March 14, 2019 12:55 PM
Politics
Warren’s camp setting low expectations for Iowa
Warren camp warns of 'breathless media narratives' out of Iowa
Warren camp warns of 'breathless media narratives' out of Iowa

I wish that the iPad Pro got full-sized ports of video games

I wish that the iPad Pro got full-sized ports of video games

Learn How This Project Was Made

I wish that the iPad Pro got full-sized ports of video games

I wish that the iPad Pro got full-sized ports of video games

I wish that the iPad Pro got full-sized ports of video games
March 14, 2019 7:13 PM
Technology

I got a 12.9 inch 2018 iPad Pro last summer as a college graduation present. I have never loved a computer as much as I love my iPad, and that is because using it feels new. The multitasking and windowing systems; the automation possibilities allowed by the system-and-app-level Shortcuts; the increasingly mature app ecosystem; using the iPad Pro as my main computer feels like using a crazy and new way of computing. It’s janky and wild and rough and crazy and I love it.

Something I don’t love: it’s an astonishingly powerful computer yet very few video games truly take advantage of it. The Nintendo Switch, admittedly a more popular and focused device, has seen ports for games like Doom, LA Noire, Wolfenstein, Skyrim, and even The Witcher 3. The iPad Pro, despite being significantly more powerful, has seen basically nothing by way of major console ports.

I understand the business rationale; there’s likely a much larger install base of prospective gamers on the Switch. But someone has to try! Red Dead Redemption 2 runs on an Xbox One, which is demonstrably less powerful than my iPad. Port it to iOS, make it iPad Pro and iPhone 11 exclusive, and charge $60! Try it out! Be crazy! Rockstar has ported previous games to the iPad to reasonable success, why not try something much bigger? Why isn’t Apple paying them whatever Google paid for the Stadia port?

We are seeing some encouraging signs among indie developers. Dead Cells’ iOS release has been met with critical acclaim and solid sales. It’s an absolute dream to play on the iPad. Same with games like Stardew Valley, Hyperlight Drifter, and Thumper.

There’s obvious proof that the iPad Pro can handle bigger games, too. Take 2 Interactive’s massive strategy game Civilization 6 has made the transition to iPad. Journey, one of the most celebrated games of the last generation, is beautiful on my giant iPad’s giant screen.

The closest thing we’ve gotten to a massive AAA game on iPad may be Sky, a beautiful and contemplative adventure from the creators of Journey. Sky is free, supported by microtransactions like player emotes, but the level of detail in the game is astounding. It looks as gorgeous as anything I’ve played on my Xbox, and it runs flawlessly on my iPad.

Developers and publishers are missing an opportunity by not taking more advantage of the power of the iPad Pro. Someone needs to take the first real shot at bringing console games to Apple’s super powered tablet. And if they are too skittish to make that leap, Apple should pay them to jump.

I wish that the iPad Pro got full-sized ports of video games

I got a 12.9 inch 2018 iPad Pro last summer as a college graduation present. I have never loved a computer as much as I love my iPad, and that is because using it feels new. The multitasking and windowing systems; the automation possibilities allowed by the system-and-app-level Shortcuts; the increasingly mature app ecosystem; using the iPad Pro as my main computer feels like using a crazy and new way of computing. It’s janky and wild and rough and crazy and I love it.

Something I don’t love: it’s an astonishingly powerful computer yet very few video games truly take advantage of it. The Nintendo Switch, admittedly a more popular and focused device, has seen ports for games like Doom, LA Noire, Wolfenstein, Skyrim, and even The Witcher 3. The iPad Pro, despite being significantly more powerful, has seen basically nothing by way of major console ports.

I understand the business rationale; there’s likely a much larger install base of prospective gamers on the Switch. But someone has to try! Red Dead Redemption 2 runs on an Xbox One, which is demonstrably less powerful than my iPad. Port it to iOS, make it iPad Pro and iPhone 11 exclusive, and charge $60! Try it out! Be crazy! Rockstar has ported previous games to the iPad to reasonable success, why not try something much bigger? Why isn’t Apple paying them whatever Google paid for the Stadia port?

We are seeing some encouraging signs among indie developers. Dead Cells’ iOS release has been met with critical acclaim and solid sales. It’s an absolute dream to play on the iPad. Same with games like Stardew Valley, Hyperlight Drifter, and Thumper.

There’s obvious proof that the iPad Pro can handle bigger games, too. Take 2 Interactive’s massive strategy game Civilization 6 has made the transition to iPad. Journey, one of the most celebrated games of the last generation, is beautiful on my giant iPad’s giant screen.

The closest thing we’ve gotten to a massive AAA game on iPad may be Sky, a beautiful and contemplative adventure from the creators of Journey. Sky is free, supported by microtransactions like player emotes, but the level of detail in the game is astounding. It looks as gorgeous as anything I’ve played on my Xbox, and it runs flawlessly on my iPad.

Developers and publishers are missing an opportunity by not taking more advantage of the power of the iPad Pro. Someone needs to take the first real shot at bringing console games to Apple’s super powered tablet. And if they are too skittish to make that leap, Apple should pay them to jump.

I wish that the iPad Pro got full-sized ports of video games

I got a 12.9 inch 2018 iPad Pro last summer as a college graduation present. I have never loved a computer as much as I love my iPad, and that is because using it feels new. The multitasking and windowing systems; the automation possibilities allowed by the system-and-app-level Shortcuts; the increasingly mature app ecosystem; using the iPad Pro as my main computer feels like using a crazy and new way of computing. It’s janky and wild and rough and crazy and I love it.

Something I don’t love: it’s an astonishingly powerful computer yet very few video games truly take advantage of it. The Nintendo Switch, admittedly a more popular and focused device, has seen ports for games like Doom, LA Noire, Wolfenstein, Skyrim, and even The Witcher 3. The iPad Pro, despite being significantly more powerful, has seen basically nothing by way of major console ports.

I understand the business rationale; there’s likely a much larger install base of prospective gamers on the Switch. But someone has to try! Red Dead Redemption 2 runs on an Xbox One, which is demonstrably less powerful than my iPad. Port it to iOS, make it iPad Pro and iPhone 11 exclusive, and charge $60! Try it out! Be crazy! Rockstar has ported previous games to the iPad to reasonable success, why not try something much bigger? Why isn’t Apple paying them whatever Google paid for the Stadia port?

We are seeing some encouraging signs among indie developers. Dead Cells’ iOS release has been met with critical acclaim and solid sales. It’s an absolute dream to play on the iPad. Same with games like Stardew Valley, Hyperlight Drifter, and Thumper.

There’s obvious proof that the iPad Pro can handle bigger games, too. Take 2 Interactive’s massive strategy game Civilization 6 has made the transition to iPad. Journey, one of the most celebrated games of the last generation, is beautiful on my giant iPad’s giant screen.

The closest thing we’ve gotten to a massive AAA game on iPad may be Sky, a beautiful and contemplative adventure from the creators of Journey. Sky is free, supported by microtransactions like player emotes, but the level of detail in the game is astounding. It looks as gorgeous as anything I’ve played on my Xbox, and it runs flawlessly on my iPad.

Developers and publishers are missing an opportunity by not taking more advantage of the power of the iPad Pro. Someone needs to take the first real shot at bringing console games to Apple’s super powered tablet. And if they are too skittish to make that leap, Apple should pay them to jump.

Hillary Clinton in Full: A Fiery New Documentary, Trump Regrets and Harsh Words for Bernie: "Nobody Likes Him"

Hillary Clinton in Full: A Fiery New Documentary, Trump Regrets and Harsh Words for Bernie: "Nobody Likes Him"

Hillary Clinton in Full: A Fiery New Documentary, Trump Regrets and Harsh Words for Bernie: "Nobody Likes Him"

The Winners and Losers of the New York Times’ deeply silly endorsement

Who is up? Who is down? Our minds are broken!

The Winners and Losers of the New York Times’ deeply silly endorsement

Learn How This Project Was Made

Who is up? Who is down? Our minds are broken!

Who is up? Who is down? Our minds are broken!

The Winners and Losers of the New York Times’ deeply silly endorsement

Who is up? Who is down? Our minds are broken!

The Winners and Losers of the New York Times’ deeply silly endorsement

The Winners and Losers of the New York Times’ deeply silly endorsement
The Winners and Losers of the New York Times’ deeply silly endorsement

Amy Klobuchar Says She Wants to Protect Obamacare—But Has Worked to Undermine It

Amy Klobuchar Says She Wants to Protect Obamacare—But Has Worked to Undermine It

Amy Klobuchar Says She Wants to Protect Obamacare—But Has Worked to Undermine It

Amy Klobuchar Says She Wants to Protect Obamacare—But Has Worked to Undermine It
/In These Times
March 14, 2019 12:55 PM
Politics
Interesting background on Klobuchar’s relationship with the ACA.
A note on Video Loss and its recent political focus

A note on Video Loss and its recent political focus

Learn How This Project Was Made

A note on Video Loss and its recent political focus

A note on Video Loss and its recent political focus

A note on Video Loss and its recent political focus
March 14, 2019 7:13 PM
Culture

Just wanted to take a quick second to clarify something about Video Loss and its recent output. I’ve been writing a lot about the 2020 election, often to the perceived detriment of other topics like media, culture, and technology.

While I will likely continue focusing on politics, especially in the lead up to the primary calendar, I do want to just say that I’ve been working on a number of bigger media and culture stories that should start hitting later this week. One media thing I’ve been working on in particular is a very large, ongoing project that I’m incredibly excited about.

As always, thanks for reading Video Loss. I’ve been feeling good about the amount of output over the last week or so, and just wanted to clarify my editorial intents.

A note on Video Loss and its recent political focus

Just wanted to take a quick second to clarify something about Video Loss and its recent output. I’ve been writing a lot about the 2020 election, often to the perceived detriment of other topics like media, culture, and technology.

While I will likely continue focusing on politics, especially in the lead up to the primary calendar, I do want to just say that I’ve been working on a number of bigger media and culture stories that should start hitting later this week. One media thing I’ve been working on in particular is a very large, ongoing project that I’m incredibly excited about.

As always, thanks for reading Video Loss. I’ve been feeling good about the amount of output over the last week or so, and just wanted to clarify my editorial intents.

A note on Video Loss and its recent political focus

Just wanted to take a quick second to clarify something about Video Loss and its recent output. I’ve been writing a lot about the 2020 election, often to the perceived detriment of other topics like media, culture, and technology.

While I will likely continue focusing on politics, especially in the lead up to the primary calendar, I do want to just say that I’ve been working on a number of bigger media and culture stories that should start hitting later this week. One media thing I’ve been working on in particular is a very large, ongoing project that I’m incredibly excited about.

As always, thanks for reading Video Loss. I’ve been feeling good about the amount of output over the last week or so, and just wanted to clarify my editorial intents.