VIDEO LOSS

a blog, newsletter, and kaleidoscope notebook about politics, the media, and culture
by tom bunting, a Real Journalist

Crisis In Our Backyards

  • How Craigslist Killed The Newspaper
  • Local News Consolidation: Explained
  • A Brief History of How The Internet Changed Journalism
  • How The City Is Covering New York As a Nonprofit
  • Inside The Battle For Better Local News
A day of media bloodletting

A day of media bloodletting

Learn How This Project Was Made

A day of media bloodletting

A day of media bloodletting

A day of media bloodletting
March 14, 2019 7:13 PM
Media

In the last twenty-four hours:

Quartz announced that 80 journalists would be laid off.

Condé Nast instituted around a hundred layoffs and a hundred furloughs, affecting employees across WIRED, Vogue, and GQ.

Buzzfeed News announced the closure of their offices in the United Kingdom and Australia, shuttering two celebrated local news teams and furloughing fourteen journalists to uncertain futures.

Forbes eliminated pay-guarantees to contributors, and reduced freelance bonuses.

The coronavirus depression has only accelerated what was inevitable: the collapse of advertising-based online media. The storm is here much earlier than publishers expected.

A day of media bloodletting

In the last twenty-four hours:

Quartz announced that 80 journalists would be laid off.

Condé Nast instituted around a hundred layoffs and a hundred furloughs, affecting employees across WIRED, Vogue, and GQ.

Buzzfeed News announced the closure of their offices in the United Kingdom and Australia, shuttering two celebrated local news teams and furloughing fourteen journalists to uncertain futures.

Forbes eliminated pay-guarantees to contributors, and reduced freelance bonuses.

The coronavirus depression has only accelerated what was inevitable: the collapse of advertising-based online media. The storm is here much earlier than publishers expected.

A day of media bloodletting

In the last twenty-four hours:

Quartz announced that 80 journalists would be laid off.

Condé Nast instituted around a hundred layoffs and a hundred furloughs, affecting employees across WIRED, Vogue, and GQ.

Buzzfeed News announced the closure of their offices in the United Kingdom and Australia, shuttering two celebrated local news teams and furloughing fourteen journalists to uncertain futures.

Forbes eliminated pay-guarantees to contributors, and reduced freelance bonuses.

The coronavirus depression has only accelerated what was inevitable: the collapse of advertising-based online media. The storm is here much earlier than publishers expected.

Pelosi’s relief bill angers the left and right

The $3 trillion HEROES Act is staggeringly large and littered with holes

Pelosi’s relief bill angers the left and right

Learn How This Project Was Made

The $3 trillion HEROES Act is staggeringly large and littered with holes

The $3 trillion HEROES Act is staggeringly large and littered with holes

Pelosi’s relief bill angers the left and right

The $3 trillion HEROES Act is staggeringly large and littered with holes

Pelosi’s relief bill angers the left and right

Pelosi’s relief bill angers the left and right
March 14, 2019 12:55 PM
Politics
Pelosi’s relief bill angers the left and right
Pelosi’s relief bill angers the left and right

The south is reopening, but people aren’t going out

The south is reopening, but people aren’t going out

Learn How This Project Was Made

The south is reopening, but people aren’t going out

The south is reopening, but people aren’t going out

The south is reopening, but people aren’t going out
March 14, 2019 7:13 PM
Culture

Over at Slate, Jordan Weissmann has some interesting data on restaurant attendance and how its changing in states that are reopening. Per Weissmann:

At restaurants that use OpenTable’s booking software, the number of diners in every state where the company tracks data was still down by 82 percent or more through Sunday, compared with a year before. That includes early reopeners like Georgia (down 92 percent), Utah (down 91 percent), Nebraska (down 90 percent), South Carolina (down 89 percent), Tennessee (down 87 percent), Texas (down 83 percent), and Oklahoma (down 82 percent).

And then here’s a chart:

img

We shall see if these attendance figures spike as reopening becomes more normalized, but I think this hits at a really important point: people aren’t going to feel safe just because the government is pushing for reopening. As Matt Yglesias astutely pointed out at Vox a few weeks ago, “opening up the economy won’t save the economy.” We’ve seen a growing partisan divide between support for lockdown measures, yet most Americans are still worried about coronavirus and support stricter social distancing measures. And this matter because restaurants are going to start running out of PPP cash to make payroll, and are going to have a harder time delaying rent payments when landlords are able to see they are, technically, reopened.

Unless customers suddenly get comfy with risking their lives for a cheeseburger—or unless Congress approves another wave of relief spending—this is going to be an immensely difficult period of time for restaurants and bars.

The south is reopening, but people aren’t going out

Over at Slate, Jordan Weissmann has some interesting data on restaurant attendance and how its changing in states that are reopening. Per Weissmann:

At restaurants that use OpenTable’s booking software, the number of diners in every state where the company tracks data was still down by 82 percent or more through Sunday, compared with a year before. That includes early reopeners like Georgia (down 92 percent), Utah (down 91 percent), Nebraska (down 90 percent), South Carolina (down 89 percent), Tennessee (down 87 percent), Texas (down 83 percent), and Oklahoma (down 82 percent).

And then here’s a chart:

img

We shall see if these attendance figures spike as reopening becomes more normalized, but I think this hits at a really important point: people aren’t going to feel safe just because the government is pushing for reopening. As Matt Yglesias astutely pointed out at Vox a few weeks ago, “opening up the economy won’t save the economy.” We’ve seen a growing partisan divide between support for lockdown measures, yet most Americans are still worried about coronavirus and support stricter social distancing measures. And this matter because restaurants are going to start running out of PPP cash to make payroll, and are going to have a harder time delaying rent payments when landlords are able to see they are, technically, reopened.

Unless customers suddenly get comfy with risking their lives for a cheeseburger—or unless Congress approves another wave of relief spending—this is going to be an immensely difficult period of time for restaurants and bars.

The south is reopening, but people aren’t going out

Over at Slate, Jordan Weissmann has some interesting data on restaurant attendance and how its changing in states that are reopening. Per Weissmann:

At restaurants that use OpenTable’s booking software, the number of diners in every state where the company tracks data was still down by 82 percent or more through Sunday, compared with a year before. That includes early reopeners like Georgia (down 92 percent), Utah (down 91 percent), Nebraska (down 90 percent), South Carolina (down 89 percent), Tennessee (down 87 percent), Texas (down 83 percent), and Oklahoma (down 82 percent).

And then here’s a chart:

img

We shall see if these attendance figures spike as reopening becomes more normalized, but I think this hits at a really important point: people aren’t going to feel safe just because the government is pushing for reopening. As Matt Yglesias astutely pointed out at Vox a few weeks ago, “opening up the economy won’t save the economy.” We’ve seen a growing partisan divide between support for lockdown measures, yet most Americans are still worried about coronavirus and support stricter social distancing measures. And this matter because restaurants are going to start running out of PPP cash to make payroll, and are going to have a harder time delaying rent payments when landlords are able to see they are, technically, reopened.

Unless customers suddenly get comfy with risking their lives for a cheeseburger—or unless Congress approves another wave of relief spending—this is going to be an immensely difficult period of time for restaurants and bars.

Under siege, Joe Biden seeks comfortable ground to discuss sexual assault allegations

Under siege, Joe Biden seeks comfortable ground to discuss sexual assault allegations

Under siege, Joe Biden seeks comfortable ground to discuss sexual assault allegations

Under siege, Joe Biden seeks comfortable ground to discuss sexual assault allegations
March 14, 2019 12:55 PM
Politics

Joe Biden has gotten this far by surviving. He ran an uninspired, dreary campaign, yet his longstanding connections to the Democratic mainstream and African-American voters ultimately propelled him to victory. Now, facing an allegation of sexual misconduct, Biden is weathering a new kind of crisis: one that requires a bold, concrete response. Tara Reade’s allegation—that Biden sexually assaulted her in the capital in the mid 1990s—isn’t going away; if anything, the story is only getting more and more concrete. Can he somehow quell skittish Democrats and incensed activists? And if he can’t, what does a path forward even look like?

We will begin to see the Biden campaign’s answer to these questions tomorrow morning, when Biden makes an appearance on MSNBC’s early-hours gabfest, Morning Joe. MSNBC PR is hyping the interview as Biden’s chance to “respond for the first time to the recent allegation of sexual assault.”

Expect some softballs. Morning Joe’s hosts, Mika Brzezinski and Joe Scarborough, are documented uncomfortable bedfellows to the MeToo movement. From attempting to professionally rehabilitate their friend Mark Halperin, to excusing Tom Brokaw’s accused misconduct, to gesturing incoherently at a “better way” to atonement for men accused of sexual misbehavior, the two have made their priorities known. It’s probably the coziest place for Biden to address this controversy.

But will it be enough? It’s impossible to say, but Biden’s professional future (to say nothing of his legacy) depends on his ability to address these allegations and somehow exonerate himself. His campaign’s current strategy—ignore and lie—has proven inadequate. We’ll see if the man himself can do any better.

Under siege, Joe Biden seeks comfortable ground to discuss sexual assault allegations

Joe Biden has gotten this far by surviving. He ran an uninspired, dreary campaign, yet his longstanding connections to the Democratic mainstream and African-American voters ultimately propelled him to victory. Now, facing an allegation of sexual misconduct, Biden is weathering a new kind of crisis: one that requires a bold, concrete response. Tara Reade’s allegation—that Biden sexually assaulted her in the capital in the mid 1990s—isn’t going away; if anything, the story is only getting more and more concrete. Can he somehow quell skittish Democrats and incensed activists? And if he can’t, what does a path forward even look like?

We will begin to see the Biden campaign’s answer to these questions tomorrow morning, when Biden makes an appearance on MSNBC’s early-hours gabfest, Morning Joe. MSNBC PR is hyping the interview as Biden’s chance to “respond for the first time to the recent allegation of sexual assault.”

Expect some softballs. Morning Joe’s hosts, Mika Brzezinski and Joe Scarborough, are documented uncomfortable bedfellows to the MeToo movement. From attempting to professionally rehabilitate their friend Mark Halperin, to excusing Tom Brokaw’s accused misconduct, to gesturing incoherently at a “better way” to atonement for men accused of sexual misbehavior, the two have made their priorities known. It’s probably the coziest place for Biden to address this controversy.

But will it be enough? It’s impossible to say, but Biden’s professional future (to say nothing of his legacy) depends on his ability to address these allegations and somehow exonerate himself. His campaign’s current strategy—ignore and lie—has proven inadequate. We’ll see if the man himself can do any better.

Under siege, Joe Biden seeks comfortable ground to discuss sexual assault allegations

Joe Biden has gotten this far by surviving. He ran an uninspired, dreary campaign, yet his longstanding connections to the Democratic mainstream and African-American voters ultimately propelled him to victory. Now, facing an allegation of sexual misconduct, Biden is weathering a new kind of crisis: one that requires a bold, concrete response. Tara Reade’s allegation—that Biden sexually assaulted her in the capital in the mid 1990s—isn’t going away; if anything, the story is only getting more and more concrete. Can he somehow quell skittish Democrats and incensed activists? And if he can’t, what does a path forward even look like?

We will begin to see the Biden campaign’s answer to these questions tomorrow morning, when Biden makes an appearance on MSNBC’s early-hours gabfest, Morning Joe. MSNBC PR is hyping the interview as Biden’s chance to “respond for the first time to the recent allegation of sexual assault.”

Expect some softballs. Morning Joe’s hosts, Mika Brzezinski and Joe Scarborough, are documented uncomfortable bedfellows to the MeToo movement. From attempting to professionally rehabilitate their friend Mark Halperin, to excusing Tom Brokaw’s accused misconduct, to gesturing incoherently at a “better way” to atonement for men accused of sexual misbehavior, the two have made their priorities known. It’s probably the coziest place for Biden to address this controversy.

But will it be enough? It’s impossible to say, but Biden’s professional future (to say nothing of his legacy) depends on his ability to address these allegations and somehow exonerate himself. His campaign’s current strategy—ignore and lie—has proven inadequate. We’ll see if the man himself can do any better.

Hey, weird, Bustle’s getting a PPP loan right after laying off two dozen staffers

Everyone’s favorite media jerk strikes again

Hey, weird, Bustle’s getting a PPP loan right after laying off two dozen staffers

Learn How This Project Was Made

Everyone’s favorite media jerk strikes again

Everyone’s favorite media jerk strikes again

Hey, weird, Bustle’s getting a PPP loan right after laying off two dozen staffers

Everyone’s favorite media jerk strikes again

Hey, weird, Bustle’s getting a PPP loan right after laying off two dozen staffers

Why is the Bernie Sanders campaign still raising money?

Why is the Bernie Sanders campaign still raising money?

Learn How This Project Was Made

Why is the Bernie Sanders campaign still raising money?

Why is the Bernie Sanders campaign still raising money?

Why is the Bernie Sanders campaign still raising money?
March 14, 2019 12:55 PM
Politics

Yesterday, the Bernie Sanders campaign sent an email out to their supporters asking them to split a donation between Alexandria Ocasio Cortez, Ilahn Omar, Rashida Talib, and...Bernie Sanders. Per the email:

Split a $5 contribution between Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, Ilhan Omar, Rashida Tlaib and our campaign today. We must elect a Congress that stands with working people, not the corporate elite.

A text with similar language was sent to supporters this morning:

Bernie 2020: Your $5 contribution split between AOC, Ilhan, Rasihda and Bernie will help elect a Congress that stands with working people, not the corporate elite.

Hm?

You may remember that Bernie Sanders is no longer running for President. He is not up for reelection in the Senate until 2024, a date where many aides suspect he’ll be retiring. The campaign ended March with around $14 million on hand per FCC filings, so this probably isn’t a debt thing either. Even weirder, the campaign spent much of March and April actively not soliciting donations, instead using his email list to direct supporters to Coronavirus-related charities.

This is probably obvious, but suspended campaigns generally don’t raise new money.

Now that Sanders has officially suspended his campaign, it’s unclear where this money will be going. Is this some weird mistake? Funds for some kind of ongoing political advocacy group? A barebones GOTV staff for upcoming primaries? A shadow campaign ready to rise up if Biden’s sexual misconduct allegations get too unbearable?

Who knows. But it’s probably not the last one. I’ve put in requests for clarification to various Sanders operations, and will update this post if I hear back.

Why is the Bernie Sanders campaign still raising money?

Yesterday, the Bernie Sanders campaign sent an email out to their supporters asking them to split a donation between Alexandria Ocasio Cortez, Ilahn Omar, Rashida Talib, and...Bernie Sanders. Per the email:

Split a $5 contribution between Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, Ilhan Omar, Rashida Tlaib and our campaign today. We must elect a Congress that stands with working people, not the corporate elite.

A text with similar language was sent to supporters this morning:

Bernie 2020: Your $5 contribution split between AOC, Ilhan, Rasihda and Bernie will help elect a Congress that stands with working people, not the corporate elite.

Hm?

You may remember that Bernie Sanders is no longer running for President. He is not up for reelection in the Senate until 2024, a date where many aides suspect he’ll be retiring. The campaign ended March with around $14 million on hand per FCC filings, so this probably isn’t a debt thing either. Even weirder, the campaign spent much of March and April actively not soliciting donations, instead using his email list to direct supporters to Coronavirus-related charities.

This is probably obvious, but suspended campaigns generally don’t raise new money.

Now that Sanders has officially suspended his campaign, it’s unclear where this money will be going. Is this some weird mistake? Funds for some kind of ongoing political advocacy group? A barebones GOTV staff for upcoming primaries? A shadow campaign ready to rise up if Biden’s sexual misconduct allegations get too unbearable?

Who knows. But it’s probably not the last one. I’ve put in requests for clarification to various Sanders operations, and will update this post if I hear back.

Why is the Bernie Sanders campaign still raising money?

Yesterday, the Bernie Sanders campaign sent an email out to their supporters asking them to split a donation between Alexandria Ocasio Cortez, Ilahn Omar, Rashida Talib, and...Bernie Sanders. Per the email:

Split a $5 contribution between Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, Ilhan Omar, Rashida Tlaib and our campaign today. We must elect a Congress that stands with working people, not the corporate elite.

A text with similar language was sent to supporters this morning:

Bernie 2020: Your $5 contribution split between AOC, Ilhan, Rasihda and Bernie will help elect a Congress that stands with working people, not the corporate elite.

Hm?

You may remember that Bernie Sanders is no longer running for President. He is not up for reelection in the Senate until 2024, a date where many aides suspect he’ll be retiring. The campaign ended March with around $14 million on hand per FCC filings, so this probably isn’t a debt thing either. Even weirder, the campaign spent much of March and April actively not soliciting donations, instead using his email list to direct supporters to Coronavirus-related charities.

This is probably obvious, but suspended campaigns generally don’t raise new money.

Now that Sanders has officially suspended his campaign, it’s unclear where this money will be going. Is this some weird mistake? Funds for some kind of ongoing political advocacy group? A barebones GOTV staff for upcoming primaries? A shadow campaign ready to rise up if Biden’s sexual misconduct allegations get too unbearable?

Who knows. But it’s probably not the last one. I’ve put in requests for clarification to various Sanders operations, and will update this post if I hear back.

Vote shaming is a scam

Vote shaming is a scam

Learn How This Project Was Made

Vote shaming is a scam

Vote shaming is a scam

Vote shaming is a scam
March 14, 2019 7:13 PM
Culture

The departure of Bernie Sanders from the Presidential primary has triggered a new wave of something I call Trump-era vote shaming. Embodied by moderate Democrats and some further left media figures, the phenomenon consists of scolding people on Twitter who are planning on not voting. The progressive commentator Mehdi Hasan has been in the midst of a multi-day Twitter meltdown over the nessecity of leftists voting for Joe Biden specifically and every Democratic candidate more broadly. In a protracted debate with leftist podcaster Kyle Kulinski, Mehdi repeatedly denounced Biden while maintaining “if you’re ok with a white nationalist winning a second term [by not voting], I question your “left-wing” credentials”.

Kulinski—who is in the middle of his own multi day meltdown about not voting—responded, “If you support a corrupt war criminal rapist for president (Biden) then I question your left wing credentials as well.”

According to Mehdi’s Twitter bio, he lives in Washington DC, one of the more comfortably blue voting areas in the country. It’s actually right up there with New York in terms of a safe Biden state, which is where Kulinski lives.

I point this out to underline that it doesn’t fucking matter who Mehdi Hasan or Kyle Kulinski votes for. Nor does it matter for the vast, vast, VAST, majority of people fighting the pro-or-anti-vote fight online, who generally live in blue districts.

The people who don’t vote are low information voters. They are not reading your political Twitter account. You are not making a difference by scolding the New York leftie who is proudly not voting on Twitter, who is also being a dumb-dumb by acting like his lack of a vote in some district in Brooklyn matters.

This is all empty posturing and it’s exhausting and no one should care.

Vote shaming is a scam

The departure of Bernie Sanders from the Presidential primary has triggered a new wave of something I call Trump-era vote shaming. Embodied by moderate Democrats and some further left media figures, the phenomenon consists of scolding people on Twitter who are planning on not voting. The progressive commentator Mehdi Hasan has been in the midst of a multi-day Twitter meltdown over the nessecity of leftists voting for Joe Biden specifically and every Democratic candidate more broadly. In a protracted debate with leftist podcaster Kyle Kulinski, Mehdi repeatedly denounced Biden while maintaining “if you’re ok with a white nationalist winning a second term [by not voting], I question your “left-wing” credentials”.

Kulinski—who is in the middle of his own multi day meltdown about not voting—responded, “If you support a corrupt war criminal rapist for president (Biden) then I question your left wing credentials as well.”

According to Mehdi’s Twitter bio, he lives in Washington DC, one of the more comfortably blue voting areas in the country. It’s actually right up there with New York in terms of a safe Biden state, which is where Kulinski lives.

I point this out to underline that it doesn’t fucking matter who Mehdi Hasan or Kyle Kulinski votes for. Nor does it matter for the vast, vast, VAST, majority of people fighting the pro-or-anti-vote fight online, who generally live in blue districts.

The people who don’t vote are low information voters. They are not reading your political Twitter account. You are not making a difference by scolding the New York leftie who is proudly not voting on Twitter, who is also being a dumb-dumb by acting like his lack of a vote in some district in Brooklyn matters.

This is all empty posturing and it’s exhausting and no one should care.

Vote shaming is a scam

The departure of Bernie Sanders from the Presidential primary has triggered a new wave of something I call Trump-era vote shaming. Embodied by moderate Democrats and some further left media figures, the phenomenon consists of scolding people on Twitter who are planning on not voting. The progressive commentator Mehdi Hasan has been in the midst of a multi-day Twitter meltdown over the nessecity of leftists voting for Joe Biden specifically and every Democratic candidate more broadly. In a protracted debate with leftist podcaster Kyle Kulinski, Mehdi repeatedly denounced Biden while maintaining “if you’re ok with a white nationalist winning a second term [by not voting], I question your “left-wing” credentials”.

Kulinski—who is in the middle of his own multi day meltdown about not voting—responded, “If you support a corrupt war criminal rapist for president (Biden) then I question your left wing credentials as well.”

According to Mehdi’s Twitter bio, he lives in Washington DC, one of the more comfortably blue voting areas in the country. It’s actually right up there with New York in terms of a safe Biden state, which is where Kulinski lives.

I point this out to underline that it doesn’t fucking matter who Mehdi Hasan or Kyle Kulinski votes for. Nor does it matter for the vast, vast, VAST, majority of people fighting the pro-or-anti-vote fight online, who generally live in blue districts.

The people who don’t vote are low information voters. They are not reading your political Twitter account. You are not making a difference by scolding the New York leftie who is proudly not voting on Twitter, who is also being a dumb-dumb by acting like his lack of a vote in some district in Brooklyn matters.

This is all empty posturing and it’s exhausting and no one should care.

Vox Media and New York Magazine Slashing Pay, Furloughing Staff Amid Coronavirus

Vox Media and New York Magazine Slashing Pay, Furloughing Staff Amid Coronavirus

Vox Media and New York Magazine Slashing Pay, Furloughing Staff Amid Coronavirus

Vox Media and New York Magazine Slashing Pay, Furloughing Staff Amid Coronavirus
/The Daily Beast
March 14, 2019 7:13 PM
Media
No layoffs yet at Vox, but a stunning amount of affected employees for a company of its size.
The breakdown begins

People are getting angry, and they should be.

The breakdown begins

Learn How This Project Was Made

People are getting angry, and they should be.

People are getting angry, and they should be.

The breakdown begins

People are getting angry, and they should be.

The breakdown begins

The breakdown begins
March 14, 2019 7:13 PM
Culture
The breakdown begins
The breakdown begins

Amazon reportedly planning drastic cuts to affiliate commission rates starting next week

Amazon reportedly planning drastic cuts to affiliate commission rates starting next week

Amazon reportedly planning drastic cuts to affiliate commission rates starting next week

Your coronavirus check is coming. Your bank can grab it.

Your coronavirus check is coming. Your bank can grab it.

Learn How This Project Was Made

Your coronavirus check is coming. Your bank can grab it.

Your coronavirus check is coming. Your bank can grab it.

Your coronavirus check is coming. Your bank can grab it.
March 14, 2019 12:55 PM
Politics
Your coronavirus check is coming. Your bank can grab it.
Your coronavirus check is coming. Your bank can grab it.

Ah, welp, here’s Obama endorsing Biden too

Ah, welp, here’s Obama endorsing Biden too

Learn How This Project Was Made

Ah, welp, here’s Obama endorsing Biden too

Ah, welp, here’s Obama endorsing Biden too

Ah, welp, here’s Obama endorsing Biden too
March 14, 2019 12:55 PM
Politics

To the surprise of no one, Barack Obama officially endorsed Joe Biden for President today. “Joe has the character and experience to lead us through one of our darker times and heal us through a long recovery,” he said in a video statement posted on his Twitter account, which already has over half a million views twenty minutes after being posted.

Obama spent the primary neutral, at least publicly. Team Trump has attempted to spin this as a lack of faith in his former Vice President. Today’s strong endorsement will likely put to rest any theories in that direction; if anything, I suspect reporting will bare out in the next few weeks that Obama had a more active role in the primary behind-the-scenes than people expected.

For Biden, Obama’s endorsement offers a chance to bring excitement and enthusiasm for a campaign that has long lacked either. The endorsement video is already performing better than just about any other video posted by Team Biden, and I’m quite curious to see if there’s a spike in their donations today. It’s a big deal.

“I’ll see you on the campaign trail as soon as I can,” Obama said at the end of the endorsement. Wonder when that’ll be!

Ah, welp, here’s Obama endorsing Biden too

To the surprise of no one, Barack Obama officially endorsed Joe Biden for President today. “Joe has the character and experience to lead us through one of our darker times and heal us through a long recovery,” he said in a video statement posted on his Twitter account, which already has over half a million views twenty minutes after being posted.

Obama spent the primary neutral, at least publicly. Team Trump has attempted to spin this as a lack of faith in his former Vice President. Today’s strong endorsement will likely put to rest any theories in that direction; if anything, I suspect reporting will bare out in the next few weeks that Obama had a more active role in the primary behind-the-scenes than people expected.

For Biden, Obama’s endorsement offers a chance to bring excitement and enthusiasm for a campaign that has long lacked either. The endorsement video is already performing better than just about any other video posted by Team Biden, and I’m quite curious to see if there’s a spike in their donations today. It’s a big deal.

“I’ll see you on the campaign trail as soon as I can,” Obama said at the end of the endorsement. Wonder when that’ll be!

Ah, welp, here’s Obama endorsing Biden too

To the surprise of no one, Barack Obama officially endorsed Joe Biden for President today. “Joe has the character and experience to lead us through one of our darker times and heal us through a long recovery,” he said in a video statement posted on his Twitter account, which already has over half a million views twenty minutes after being posted.

Obama spent the primary neutral, at least publicly. Team Trump has attempted to spin this as a lack of faith in his former Vice President. Today’s strong endorsement will likely put to rest any theories in that direction; if anything, I suspect reporting will bare out in the next few weeks that Obama had a more active role in the primary behind-the-scenes than people expected.

For Biden, Obama’s endorsement offers a chance to bring excitement and enthusiasm for a campaign that has long lacked either. The endorsement video is already performing better than just about any other video posted by Team Biden, and I’m quite curious to see if there’s a spike in their donations today. It’s a big deal.

“I’ll see you on the campaign trail as soon as I can,” Obama said at the end of the endorsement. Wonder when that’ll be!

Democrats and Bernie Sanders unify to drag Joe Biden across the finish line

On Bernie Sanders’ expected and disappointing endorsement

Democrats and Bernie Sanders unify to drag Joe Biden across the finish line

Learn How This Project Was Made

On Bernie Sanders’ expected and disappointing endorsement

On Bernie Sanders’ expected and disappointing endorsement

Democrats and Bernie Sanders unify to drag Joe Biden across the finish line

On Bernie Sanders’ expected and disappointing endorsement

Democrats and Bernie Sanders unify to drag Joe Biden across the finish line

Democrats and Bernie Sanders unify to drag Joe Biden across the finish line
Democrats and Bernie Sanders unify to drag Joe Biden across the finish line

As digital media faces decimation, Vox launches a membership program

To stave off a paywall or layoffs, Vox is asking readers for donations

As digital media faces decimation, Vox launches a membership program

Learn How This Project Was Made

To stave off a paywall or layoffs, Vox is asking readers for donations

To stave off a paywall or layoffs, Vox is asking readers for donations

As digital media faces decimation, Vox launches a membership program

To stave off a paywall or layoffs, Vox is asking readers for donations

As digital media faces decimation, Vox launches a membership program

As digital media faces decimation, Vox launches a membership program
March 14, 2019 7:13 PM
Media
As digital media faces decimation, Vox launches a membership program
As digital media faces decimation, Vox launches a membership program

In an essential test, Joe Biden is failing

Voters and poll workers may die today. Joe Biden seems to be okay with that.

In an essential test, Joe Biden is failing

Learn How This Project Was Made

Voters and poll workers may die today. Joe Biden seems to be okay with that.

Voters and poll workers may die today. Joe Biden seems to be okay with that.

In an essential test, Joe Biden is failing

Voters and poll workers may die today. Joe Biden seems to be okay with that.

In an essential test, Joe Biden is failing

In an essential test, Joe Biden is failing
March 14, 2019 12:55 PM
Politics
In an essential test, Joe Biden is failing
In an essential test, Joe Biden is failing

Bustle Digital Group Makes Staff Cuts Due to Coronavirus

Bustle Digital Group Makes Staff Cuts Due to Coronavirus

Learn How This Project Was Made

Bustle Digital Group Makes Staff Cuts Due to Coronavirus

Bustle Digital Group Makes Staff Cuts Due to Coronavirus

Bustle Digital Group Makes Staff Cuts Due to Coronavirus
March 14, 2019 7:13 PM
Media

By Sara Jerde:

Bustle Digital Group laid off two dozen staffers, ceased operating a publication and announced widespread pay cuts today, as the effects of the coronavirus continues to make its way through the media industry.

Out of approximately 300 employees at BDG, 24 people were laid off across sectors of the company, including editorial, sales, video and events as well as staffers working on The Outline, a company it acquired last year, and that executives are now “halting operations” on.

After four years, The Outline is no more. The site was born out of Joshua Topolsky’s relentless ambition after being fired from Bloomberg; a venture-backed attempt to build a “New Yorker for millennials“. That well of funding allowed The Outline to aim high in its first year, creating a daily podcast, robust video department, and stable of high-profile editors and staff writers. This was all underpinned by a divisive visual design, capable of Instagram-style card stacks and unique advertising. Plans to secure exclusive advertising from high-value brands never really materialized, and staff of The Outline endured waves of layoffs before ultimately selling to Bryan Goldberg’s Bustle Media Group.

While Topolsky founded The Outline, the site’s irrelevant and unapologetically rambunctious tone was best embodied by Leah Finnegan, a longtime editorial leader at the site. Formerly of Gawker, Finnegan crafted a strong team of editors and gave the site a reputation for publishing bold, interesting stories from up-and-coming writers. Their work at The Outline will be missed greatly.

Bustle Digital Group Makes Staff Cuts Due to Coronavirus

By Sara Jerde:

Bustle Digital Group laid off two dozen staffers, ceased operating a publication and announced widespread pay cuts today, as the effects of the coronavirus continues to make its way through the media industry.

Out of approximately 300 employees at BDG, 24 people were laid off across sectors of the company, including editorial, sales, video and events as well as staffers working on The Outline, a company it acquired last year, and that executives are now “halting operations” on.

After four years, The Outline is no more. The site was born out of Joshua Topolsky’s relentless ambition after being fired from Bloomberg; a venture-backed attempt to build a “New Yorker for millennials“. That well of funding allowed The Outline to aim high in its first year, creating a daily podcast, robust video department, and stable of high-profile editors and staff writers. This was all underpinned by a divisive visual design, capable of Instagram-style card stacks and unique advertising. Plans to secure exclusive advertising from high-value brands never really materialized, and staff of The Outline endured waves of layoffs before ultimately selling to Bryan Goldberg’s Bustle Media Group.

While Topolsky founded The Outline, the site’s irrelevant and unapologetically rambunctious tone was best embodied by Leah Finnegan, a longtime editorial leader at the site. Formerly of Gawker, Finnegan crafted a strong team of editors and gave the site a reputation for publishing bold, interesting stories from up-and-coming writers. Their work at The Outline will be missed greatly.

Bustle Digital Group Makes Staff Cuts Due to Coronavirus

By Sara Jerde:

Bustle Digital Group laid off two dozen staffers, ceased operating a publication and announced widespread pay cuts today, as the effects of the coronavirus continues to make its way through the media industry.

Out of approximately 300 employees at BDG, 24 people were laid off across sectors of the company, including editorial, sales, video and events as well as staffers working on The Outline, a company it acquired last year, and that executives are now “halting operations” on.

After four years, The Outline is no more. The site was born out of Joshua Topolsky’s relentless ambition after being fired from Bloomberg; a venture-backed attempt to build a “New Yorker for millennials“. That well of funding allowed The Outline to aim high in its first year, creating a daily podcast, robust video department, and stable of high-profile editors and staff writers. This was all underpinned by a divisive visual design, capable of Instagram-style card stacks and unique advertising. Plans to secure exclusive advertising from high-value brands never really materialized, and staff of The Outline endured waves of layoffs before ultimately selling to Bryan Goldberg’s Bustle Media Group.

While Topolsky founded The Outline, the site’s irrelevant and unapologetically rambunctious tone was best embodied by Leah Finnegan, a longtime editorial leader at the site. Formerly of Gawker, Finnegan crafted a strong team of editors and gave the site a reputation for publishing bold, interesting stories from up-and-coming writers. Their work at The Outline will be missed greatly.

Sanders calls for delay in Tuesday’s Wisconsin primary

Sanders calls for delay in Tuesday’s Wisconsin primary

Sanders calls for delay in Tuesday’s Wisconsin primary

Sanders calls for delay in Tuesday’s Wisconsin primary
March 14, 2019 12:55 PM
Politics

Bernie Sanders is calling for a delay on Tuesday’s Wisconsin primary, the only primary that is currently scheduled to take place in unaltered form in the next month as the nation weathers an outbreak of the novel coronavirus. “People should not be forced to put their lives on the line to vote,” his campaign said in a statement.

Wisconsin residents are currently following the same shelter-in-place ordinance that many other states are experiencing. The state’s governor, Democrat Tony Evers, has also banned all public and private gatherings. Federal guidelines recommend social distancing and limited interaction as well. Despite that, the state is still barreling ahead with a primary scheduled for April 7th. The timing has led to a shortage of poll workers and overwhelming requests for mail-in ballots.

The state’s decision to continue with Tuesday’s election stands in contrast with every other state that was scheduled to vote this month. 15 other states scheduled to vote in March and April, including New York and Ohio, have pushed back their primaries and dramatically expanded mail-in voting options. Activists in Wisconsin are currently suing the state to force a delay.

Cynics may point out that Sanders has ample reason to hope for this; he currently trails Biden in delegate numbers and is considered an underdog in Wisconsin. Yet Sanders has demonstrated a consistent stance on delaying votes to prioritize voter safety. His campaign suspended GOTV efforts in Arizona, Florida, and Illinois, which voted on March 17th and expressed dismay about the states’ decision to proceed with their primaries. Biden aides accused the campaign of attempting to suppress votes and encouraged voters to go out to the polls “if they feel healthy.” At least three poll officials in Florida have since tested positive for coronavirus. Biden has yet to comment on next Tuesday’s election.

Sanders calls for delay in Tuesday’s Wisconsin primary

Bernie Sanders is calling for a delay on Tuesday’s Wisconsin primary, the only primary that is currently scheduled to take place in unaltered form in the next month as the nation weathers an outbreak of the novel coronavirus. “People should not be forced to put their lives on the line to vote,” his campaign said in a statement.

Wisconsin residents are currently following the same shelter-in-place ordinance that many other states are experiencing. The state’s governor, Democrat Tony Evers, has also banned all public and private gatherings. Federal guidelines recommend social distancing and limited interaction as well. Despite that, the state is still barreling ahead with a primary scheduled for April 7th. The timing has led to a shortage of poll workers and overwhelming requests for mail-in ballots.

The state’s decision to continue with Tuesday’s election stands in contrast with every other state that was scheduled to vote this month. 15 other states scheduled to vote in March and April, including New York and Ohio, have pushed back their primaries and dramatically expanded mail-in voting options. Activists in Wisconsin are currently suing the state to force a delay.

Cynics may point out that Sanders has ample reason to hope for this; he currently trails Biden in delegate numbers and is considered an underdog in Wisconsin. Yet Sanders has demonstrated a consistent stance on delaying votes to prioritize voter safety. His campaign suspended GOTV efforts in Arizona, Florida, and Illinois, which voted on March 17th and expressed dismay about the states’ decision to proceed with their primaries. Biden aides accused the campaign of attempting to suppress votes and encouraged voters to go out to the polls “if they feel healthy.” At least three poll officials in Florida have since tested positive for coronavirus. Biden has yet to comment on next Tuesday’s election.

Sanders calls for delay in Tuesday’s Wisconsin primary

Bernie Sanders is calling for a delay on Tuesday’s Wisconsin primary, the only primary that is currently scheduled to take place in unaltered form in the next month as the nation weathers an outbreak of the novel coronavirus. “People should not be forced to put their lives on the line to vote,” his campaign said in a statement.

Wisconsin residents are currently following the same shelter-in-place ordinance that many other states are experiencing. The state’s governor, Democrat Tony Evers, has also banned all public and private gatherings. Federal guidelines recommend social distancing and limited interaction as well. Despite that, the state is still barreling ahead with a primary scheduled for April 7th. The timing has led to a shortage of poll workers and overwhelming requests for mail-in ballots.

The state’s decision to continue with Tuesday’s election stands in contrast with every other state that was scheduled to vote this month. 15 other states scheduled to vote in March and April, including New York and Ohio, have pushed back their primaries and dramatically expanded mail-in voting options. Activists in Wisconsin are currently suing the state to force a delay.

Cynics may point out that Sanders has ample reason to hope for this; he currently trails Biden in delegate numbers and is considered an underdog in Wisconsin. Yet Sanders has demonstrated a consistent stance on delaying votes to prioritize voter safety. His campaign suspended GOTV efforts in Arizona, Florida, and Illinois, which voted on March 17th and expressed dismay about the states’ decision to proceed with their primaries. Biden aides accused the campaign of attempting to suppress votes and encouraged voters to go out to the polls “if they feel healthy.” At least three poll officials in Florida have since tested positive for coronavirus. Biden has yet to comment on next Tuesday’s election.

So What Else Has Been Going On?

Video Loss hasn’t published since March 3rd. Uh...a lot has happened since then

So What Else Has Been Going On?

Learn How This Project Was Made

Video Loss hasn’t published since March 3rd. Uh...a lot has happened since then

Video Loss hasn’t published since March 3rd. Uh...a lot has happened since then

So What Else Has Been Going On?

Video Loss hasn’t published since March 3rd. Uh...a lot has happened since then

So What Else Has Been Going On?

So What Else Has Been Going On?
March 14, 2019 7:13 PM
Culture
So What Else Has Been Going On?
So What Else Has Been Going On?

Biden wins really big

Biden wins really big

Learn How This Project Was Made

Biden wins really big

Biden wins really big

Biden wins really big
March 14, 2019 12:55 PM
Politics

Welp, folks, with 100% of the vote in, Joe Biden has decisively won the South Carolina primary. He beat Bernie Sanders by a large margin: 48.4% to 19.9%. He carried every single county. A truly remarkable win for a former frontrunner who desperately, desperately needed it.

Where do things go from here? I’m not entirely sure. Earlier in the day, before the polls closed, Biden told press that “the bigger the win, the bigger the bump” he expects to see in Super Tuesday states. This is clearly a large win, yet a lot of Super Tuesday states have been doing early voting for days or weeks by now; it’s going to be hard for much of a shift in big states like California and Texas to materialize. There’s also the question of the health of Biden’s campaign: press reports have casted doubts on the Biden infrastructure in upcoming states, and it’s widely believed in South Carolina political circles that Biden’s win is credited more to Representative Clyburn’s late endorsement than any messaging or organizing brilliance. (Clyburn, for his part, bluntly told CNN today that Biden’s campaign was “mishandled” and needed retooling.)

So Super Tuesday is likely still going to be a grind for Biden. The lasting impact of tonight will likely be consolidation of moderate support around Biden. The other moderate candidates—namely Buttigieg and Klobuchar—were all destroyed by Biden and will leave the state with few if any delegates. You can’t build a coalition without black support; Sanders also performed badly tonight, but he at least can point to strong support among black voters nationally. I’m not sure if we will see any high-profile dropouts before Super Tuesday, but unless something significantly changes between then and now, I don’t think the other moderates will stick around for much longer. And that’s what I’d be really worried about if I was in Camp Sanders: he’s strongly benefited from a divided moderate field, and there are a number of upcoming states that would be more difficult to win if it was just between him and Biden.

This is all a long-winded way of saying that tonight set the stage for a protracted Sanders-Biden fight, a bitter ideological struggle that may well drag on until the convention in the Summer. There are two wildcards here: Warren and Bloomberg. Bloomberg, coming off two disastrous debate performances and weeks of bad press, looks much less invincible than he did last month. By Tuesday night, we should have some idea of how viable Bloomberg’s bizzare run actually is.

Warren, for reasons that completely elude me, seems content driving a scorched earth path straight to the convention. In her speech tonight, she attacked Sanders—her closest ideological peer—as a political figure that “consistently calls for things he fails to get done, and consistently opposes things he nevertheless fails to stop.” As for future contests, she said “Super Tuesday is three days away and we’re looking forward to gaining as many delegates to the convention as we can,” again openly gesturing to the idea of getting the nomination at a brokered convention, even without winning a single state. It’s an ugly, bizarre twist in her campaign, and it remains to be seen whether this is the last gasps of a failed candidacy or a campaign that’s about to go full Jonestown.

A year ago, before Bloomberg and before four high-profile Senators flamed out and before coronavirus, national polls showed a tight race between Bernie Sanders and Joe Biden. Billions of dollars later, we may be returning to that early dynamic.

Biden wins really big

Welp, folks, with 100% of the vote in, Joe Biden has decisively won the South Carolina primary. He beat Bernie Sanders by a large margin: 48.4% to 19.9%. He carried every single county. A truly remarkable win for a former frontrunner who desperately, desperately needed it.

Where do things go from here? I’m not entirely sure. Earlier in the day, before the polls closed, Biden told press that “the bigger the win, the bigger the bump” he expects to see in Super Tuesday states. This is clearly a large win, yet a lot of Super Tuesday states have been doing early voting for days or weeks by now; it’s going to be hard for much of a shift in big states like California and Texas to materialize. There’s also the question of the health of Biden’s campaign: press reports have casted doubts on the Biden infrastructure in upcoming states, and it’s widely believed in South Carolina political circles that Biden’s win is credited more to Representative Clyburn’s late endorsement than any messaging or organizing brilliance. (Clyburn, for his part, bluntly told CNN today that Biden’s campaign was “mishandled” and needed retooling.)

So Super Tuesday is likely still going to be a grind for Biden. The lasting impact of tonight will likely be consolidation of moderate support around Biden. The other moderate candidates—namely Buttigieg and Klobuchar—were all destroyed by Biden and will leave the state with few if any delegates. You can’t build a coalition without black support; Sanders also performed badly tonight, but he at least can point to strong support among black voters nationally. I’m not sure if we will see any high-profile dropouts before Super Tuesday, but unless something significantly changes between then and now, I don’t think the other moderates will stick around for much longer. And that’s what I’d be really worried about if I was in Camp Sanders: he’s strongly benefited from a divided moderate field, and there are a number of upcoming states that would be more difficult to win if it was just between him and Biden.

This is all a long-winded way of saying that tonight set the stage for a protracted Sanders-Biden fight, a bitter ideological struggle that may well drag on until the convention in the Summer. There are two wildcards here: Warren and Bloomberg. Bloomberg, coming off two disastrous debate performances and weeks of bad press, looks much less invincible than he did last month. By Tuesday night, we should have some idea of how viable Bloomberg’s bizzare run actually is.

Warren, for reasons that completely elude me, seems content driving a scorched earth path straight to the convention. In her speech tonight, she attacked Sanders—her closest ideological peer—as a political figure that “consistently calls for things he fails to get done, and consistently opposes things he nevertheless fails to stop.” As for future contests, she said “Super Tuesday is three days away and we’re looking forward to gaining as many delegates to the convention as we can,” again openly gesturing to the idea of getting the nomination at a brokered convention, even without winning a single state. It’s an ugly, bizarre twist in her campaign, and it remains to be seen whether this is the last gasps of a failed candidacy or a campaign that’s about to go full Jonestown.

A year ago, before Bloomberg and before four high-profile Senators flamed out and before coronavirus, national polls showed a tight race between Bernie Sanders and Joe Biden. Billions of dollars later, we may be returning to that early dynamic.

Biden wins really big

Welp, folks, with 100% of the vote in, Joe Biden has decisively won the South Carolina primary. He beat Bernie Sanders by a large margin: 48.4% to 19.9%. He carried every single county. A truly remarkable win for a former frontrunner who desperately, desperately needed it.

Where do things go from here? I’m not entirely sure. Earlier in the day, before the polls closed, Biden told press that “the bigger the win, the bigger the bump” he expects to see in Super Tuesday states. This is clearly a large win, yet a lot of Super Tuesday states have been doing early voting for days or weeks by now; it’s going to be hard for much of a shift in big states like California and Texas to materialize. There’s also the question of the health of Biden’s campaign: press reports have casted doubts on the Biden infrastructure in upcoming states, and it’s widely believed in South Carolina political circles that Biden’s win is credited more to Representative Clyburn’s late endorsement than any messaging or organizing brilliance. (Clyburn, for his part, bluntly told CNN today that Biden’s campaign was “mishandled” and needed retooling.)

So Super Tuesday is likely still going to be a grind for Biden. The lasting impact of tonight will likely be consolidation of moderate support around Biden. The other moderate candidates—namely Buttigieg and Klobuchar—were all destroyed by Biden and will leave the state with few if any delegates. You can’t build a coalition without black support; Sanders also performed badly tonight, but he at least can point to strong support among black voters nationally. I’m not sure if we will see any high-profile dropouts before Super Tuesday, but unless something significantly changes between then and now, I don’t think the other moderates will stick around for much longer. And that’s what I’d be really worried about if I was in Camp Sanders: he’s strongly benefited from a divided moderate field, and there are a number of upcoming states that would be more difficult to win if it was just between him and Biden.

This is all a long-winded way of saying that tonight set the stage for a protracted Sanders-Biden fight, a bitter ideological struggle that may well drag on until the convention in the Summer. There are two wildcards here: Warren and Bloomberg. Bloomberg, coming off two disastrous debate performances and weeks of bad press, looks much less invincible than he did last month. By Tuesday night, we should have some idea of how viable Bloomberg’s bizzare run actually is.

Warren, for reasons that completely elude me, seems content driving a scorched earth path straight to the convention. In her speech tonight, she attacked Sanders—her closest ideological peer—as a political figure that “consistently calls for things he fails to get done, and consistently opposes things he nevertheless fails to stop.” As for future contests, she said “Super Tuesday is three days away and we’re looking forward to gaining as many delegates to the convention as we can,” again openly gesturing to the idea of getting the nomination at a brokered convention, even without winning a single state. It’s an ugly, bizarre twist in her campaign, and it remains to be seen whether this is the last gasps of a failed candidacy or a campaign that’s about to go full Jonestown.

A year ago, before Bloomberg and before four high-profile Senators flamed out and before coronavirus, national polls showed a tight race between Bernie Sanders and Joe Biden. Billions of dollars later, we may be returning to that early dynamic.