VIDEO LOSS

a blog about politics, the media, and culture by tom bunting, a Real Journalist

Welcome to the new Video Loss

Things look new, but the mission (lol) is the same

Correction for “Hillary Clinton’s Gabbard-Russia comment shows misinformation can fester anywhere”

Correction for “Hillary Clinton’s Gabbard-Russia comment shows misinformation can fester anywhere”

Correction for “Hillary Clinton’s Gabbard-Russia comment shows misinformation can fester anywhere”

Correction for “Hillary Clinton’s Gabbard-Russia comment shows misinformation can fester anywhere”

Last week, I published an article criticizing Hillary Clinton’s recent comments about Tulsi Gabbard and Russia. The crux on my piece hinged on the following statement by Clinton on the Campaign HQ podcast: 

They are also going to do third-party again, and I’m not making any predictions but I think they got their eye on somebody who is currently in the Democratic primary and are grooming her to be the third-party candidate. She is a favorite of the Russians. They have a bunch of sites and bots and other ways of supporting her so far.

Because Clinton was previously talking about Russian interference in the 2016 election—and because she then spoke again about the Russians in the next sentence—I assumed that the initial “they” in this statement was Russia. This assumption was also shared by the New York Times, Politico, and the majority of mainstream news websites that covered the comments. (The host of the podcast, David Plouffe, also portrays her statement this way at the end of the show.)

However, according to Clinton spokesman Nick Merrill, the former Secretary of State was referring to the Republicans. As in: 

The Republicans are also going to do third-party again, and I’m not making any predictions but I think they got their eye on somebody who is currently in the Democratic primary and are grooming her to be the third-party candidate.

It’s linguistically sloppy on Clinton’s part, and I’d argue that she should be more specific when talking about allegations of this magnitude. However, I have no reason to believe Merrill is lying, and as such I’ve taken the article down. 

I apologize to my readers for contributing to a news cycle that was based partially on a misinterpreted statement. I will try to make sure an error like this doesn’t happen again. Misinformation can certainly fester anywhere. 

Correction for “Hillary Clinton’s Gabbard-Russia comment shows misinformation can fester anywhere”

Last week, I published an article criticizing Hillary Clinton’s recent comments about Tulsi Gabbard and Russia. The crux on my piece hinged on the following statement by Clinton on the Campaign HQ podcast: 

They are also going to do third-party again, and I’m not making any predictions but I think they got their eye on somebody who is currently in the Democratic primary and are grooming her to be the third-party candidate. She is a favorite of the Russians. They have a bunch of sites and bots and other ways of supporting her so far.

Because Clinton was previously talking about Russian interference in the 2016 election—and because she then spoke again about the Russians in the next sentence—I assumed that the initial “they” in this statement was Russia. This assumption was also shared by the New York Times, Politico, and the majority of mainstream news websites that covered the comments. (The host of the podcast, David Plouffe, also portrays her statement this way at the end of the show.)

However, according to Clinton spokesman Nick Merrill, the former Secretary of State was referring to the Republicans. As in: 

The Republicans are also going to do third-party again, and I’m not making any predictions but I think they got their eye on somebody who is currently in the Democratic primary and are grooming her to be the third-party candidate.

It’s linguistically sloppy on Clinton’s part, and I’d argue that she should be more specific when talking about allegations of this magnitude. However, I have no reason to believe Merrill is lying, and as such I’ve taken the article down. 

I apologize to my readers for contributing to a news cycle that was based partially on a misinterpreted statement. I will try to make sure an error like this doesn’t happen again. Misinformation can certainly fester anywhere. 

The significance of Ocasio-Cortez endorsing Sanders

The significance of Ocasio-Cortez endorsing Sanders

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The significance of Ocasio-Cortez endorsing Sanders

The significance of Ocasio-Cortez endorsing Sanders

The significance of Ocasio-Cortez endorsing Sanders

At a massive rally today in New York City, Congresswoman Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez formally endorsed Senator Bernie Sanders. The endorsement, which leaked earlier this week during the fourth Democratic debate, has been covered nationally, a rare moment of news cycle domination for a campaign that’s often struggle to get positive mainstream coverage.

There has been some skepticism about how significant Ocasio-Cortez’s endorsement is. Sanders surrogate Jonathan Tasini told Politico that Ocasio-Cortez fans who didn’t already support Sanders “could fit into a booth at the local diner.” Former Clinton 2016 aide Jess Morales Rocketto questioned to the New York Times whether Ocasio-Cortez is “super influential to voters in Iowa, New Hampshire, Nevada and South Carolina.”

These are both fair critiques, but I think they are somewhat missing the point of the endorsement. Ocasio-Cortez’s support isn’t meant to jumpstart Sander’s flagging poll numbers in early states, it’s a media and base play meant to reset the narrative around the campaign and energize his supporters. For a campaign that often attempts to position itself outside of conventional political thought, I’m struck by how politically savvy Ocasio-Cortez’s endorsement has been handled by the Sanders camp. 

Here’s why I think the endorsement—and its handling—matters:

- It resets the narrative around Sander’s campaign in the media. Even before a heart attack took Sanders off the trail for two weeks, his numbers in early states were going down amid a lot of media chatter around Warren’s rise. By leaking the endorsement right after a strong debate performance earlier this week, Sander’s camp practically guaranteed the media would be talking about his comeback rather than predicting his demise.

- Ocasio-Cortez isn’t the most influential or popular politician in America, but she’s one of the most-covered by the media.  Her endorsement was one of the most sought-after this cycle partially because of this; anyone who got her support was going to get a ton of press coverage for it. Sanders got that; while getting a ton of coverage about how the fight for the American left is still raging between him and Warren.

- Ocasio-Cortez is also wildly popular among Sanders base and liberals generally. Her endorsement seemed to reenergize his support among the Sanders faithful; which built directly into the massive rally we saw today. That rally was a tremendous show of force for the Sanders campaign and drove another positive media cycle for the campaign. Ocasio-Cortez is also expected to travel with Sanders to California, where I’d expect she’d be really useful at getting the campaign more media attention and turning out undecided liberals who like her and may have otherwise been leaning towards Warren.

- Ocasio-Cortez’s support dispels a common myth about Sander’s demographic support. We’ve know for a while now that Sander’s support cuts across generational lines rather than racial lines. Yet there’s a pretty accepted mainstream narrative that Sanders supporters are predominantly white and male. While it’s frustrating that a single prominent woman of color’s support would change that narrative, I do think it’s an optically important endorsement that will go a long way in dispelling that myth in mainstream political circles. 

While I don’t think AOC’s endorsement will do much to shift poll numbers (which I’d expect to continue to slide down as the news of Sander’s heart attack continues to reverberate), I do think it’s undeniable that her endorsement is a significant boon for the campaign. They’ve handled the rollout incredibly well, and I think it significantly shifts the narrative around their campaign in a way that will benefit them in the long run. 


The significance of Ocasio-Cortez endorsing Sanders

At a massive rally today in New York City, Congresswoman Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez formally endorsed Senator Bernie Sanders. The endorsement, which leaked earlier this week during the fourth Democratic debate, has been covered nationally, a rare moment of news cycle domination for a campaign that’s often struggle to get positive mainstream coverage.

There has been some skepticism about how significant Ocasio-Cortez’s endorsement is. Sanders surrogate Jonathan Tasini told Politico that Ocasio-Cortez fans who didn’t already support Sanders “could fit into a booth at the local diner.” Former Clinton 2016 aide Jess Morales Rocketto questioned to the New York Times whether Ocasio-Cortez is “super influential to voters in Iowa, New Hampshire, Nevada and South Carolina.”

These are both fair critiques, but I think they are somewhat missing the point of the endorsement. Ocasio-Cortez’s support isn’t meant to jumpstart Sander’s flagging poll numbers in early states, it’s a media and base play meant to reset the narrative around the campaign and energize his supporters. For a campaign that often attempts to position itself outside of conventional political thought, I’m struck by how politically savvy Ocasio-Cortez’s endorsement has been handled by the Sanders camp. 

Here’s why I think the endorsement—and its handling—matters:

- It resets the narrative around Sander’s campaign in the media. Even before a heart attack took Sanders off the trail for two weeks, his numbers in early states were going down amid a lot of media chatter around Warren’s rise. By leaking the endorsement right after a strong debate performance earlier this week, Sander’s camp practically guaranteed the media would be talking about his comeback rather than predicting his demise.

- Ocasio-Cortez isn’t the most influential or popular politician in America, but she’s one of the most-covered by the media.  Her endorsement was one of the most sought-after this cycle partially because of this; anyone who got her support was going to get a ton of press coverage for it. Sanders got that; while getting a ton of coverage about how the fight for the American left is still raging between him and Warren.

- Ocasio-Cortez is also wildly popular among Sanders base and liberals generally. Her endorsement seemed to reenergize his support among the Sanders faithful; which built directly into the massive rally we saw today. That rally was a tremendous show of force for the Sanders campaign and drove another positive media cycle for the campaign. Ocasio-Cortez is also expected to travel with Sanders to California, where I’d expect she’d be really useful at getting the campaign more media attention and turning out undecided liberals who like her and may have otherwise been leaning towards Warren.

- Ocasio-Cortez’s support dispels a common myth about Sander’s demographic support. We’ve know for a while now that Sander’s support cuts across generational lines rather than racial lines. Yet there’s a pretty accepted mainstream narrative that Sanders supporters are predominantly white and male. While it’s frustrating that a single prominent woman of color’s support would change that narrative, I do think it’s an optically important endorsement that will go a long way in dispelling that myth in mainstream political circles. 

While I don’t think AOC’s endorsement will do much to shift poll numbers (which I’d expect to continue to slide down as the news of Sander’s heart attack continues to reverberate), I do think it’s undeniable that her endorsement is a significant boon for the campaign. They’ve handled the rollout incredibly well, and I think it significantly shifts the narrative around their campaign in a way that will benefit them in the long run. 


Tulsi Gabbard responds to Clinton’s Russia accusation

Tulsi Gabbard responds to Clinton’s Russia accusation

Tulsi Gabbard responds to Clinton’s Russia accusation

Great! Thank you. You, the queen of warmongers, embodiment of corruption, and personification of the rot that has sickened the Democratic Party for so long, have finally come out from behind the curtain. From the day I announced my candidacy, there has been a concerted campaign to destroy my reputation. We wondered who was behind it and why. Now we know — it was always you, through your proxies and powerful allies in the corporate media and war machine, afraid of the threat I pose. It’s now clear that this primary is between you and me. Don’t cowardly hide behind your proxies. Join the race directly.

@TulsiGabbard

Something that always bears repeating: Tulsi Gabbard is a fucking weirdo. Clinton did nothing today but give Gabbard red meat to her similarly-weirdo base.

Tulsi Gabbard responds to Clinton’s Russia accusation
Tulsi Gabbard responds to Clinton’s Russia accusation

Is USA Today’s print edition headed for the sunset as GateHouse and Gannett merge? Signs point to yes.

Is USA Today’s print edition headed for the sunset as GateHouse and Gannett merge? Signs point to yes.

Bernie Sanders: We will make history

Bernie Sanders: We will make history

Bernie Sanders: We will make history

But let me relay to you an experience that I had lying in a hospital bed in Las Vegas after the heart attack. And I thought about a lot of things, but one of the things that went through my brain is what would have happened if I did not have the good health insurance that I have? And it made me feel even more strongly, the need for us to continue our efforts to end this dysfunctional and cruel system that leaves so many people uninsured, underinsured, causes bankruptcy, lowers credit scores, for people who owe medical debt. It's an insane, corrupt, bureaucratic system based on the greed of the health care industry. So I gotta tell you, that even as I sat and lied down in that hospital bed in Las Vegas, the issue of the struggle we are engaged in permeated in my mind. And I want all of you to understand that the day is gonna come when you’re gonna be talking to your kids and you’re gonna be talking to your grandchildren and say “you know what, I was involved in that struggle that finally brought health care to all Americans as a human right.”

- Bernie Sanders, in a video posted by his campaign on Youtube

A really inspiring and impressive rallying call from Sanders to his supporters, his first real statement after a heart attack took him off the campaign trail last week. It’s notable how effective Sander’s usual message of political revolution is when he ties it to personal experience. This is the first time I’ve really heard him talk about the future in these terms, it strikes me as a surprising acknowledgment of his own mortality for a candidate who hates talking about himself. 

I’ve seen some polling indicating that he’s taken a hit from this cycle and the speculation around his health. That makes sense, but I do believe he may have an opportunity to gain momentum if he keeps speaking like this. 

Bernie Sanders: We will make history
Bernie Sanders: We will make history

Shepard Smith leaving Fox News is only a big deal for media observers

The battle for Fox News’ soul was never really a war

Shepard Smith leaving Fox News is only a big deal for media observers

Learn How This Project Was Made

The battle for Fox News’ soul was never really a war

The battle for Fox News’ soul was never really a war

Shepard Smith leaving Fox News is only a big deal for media observers

The battle for Fox News’ soul was never really a war

Shepard Smith leaving Fox News is only a big deal for media observers

Shepard Smith leaving Fox News is only a big deal for media observers

HBO is bringing back that boring Axios news show

HBO is bringing back that boring Axios news show

HBO is bringing back that boring Axios news show

HBO is bringing back that boring Axios news show

In a relatively surprising bit of news, HBO announced yesterday that Axios on HBO will be returning for two more seasons. The deal weds the attention-deficit-disordered news source and the increasingly zombified prestige cable channel together past the 2020 election. 

You might remember that HBO killed their other outside-partner news show, VICE News Tonight, earlier this year. That show—which was much better produced and infinitely more useful journalistically—cost a lot to make and didn’t get a ton of attention. Comparatively, Axios on HBO, is cheaper, breaks way more mainstream news, and ties HBO to one of the few online media brand that isn’t currently on fire

A true shame, but it’s really all our faults for expecting more from our monolithic content providers. 

HBO is bringing back that boring Axios news show

In a relatively surprising bit of news, HBO announced yesterday that Axios on HBO will be returning for two more seasons. The deal weds the attention-deficit-disordered news source and the increasingly zombified prestige cable channel together past the 2020 election. 

You might remember that HBO killed their other outside-partner news show, VICE News Tonight, earlier this year. That show—which was much better produced and infinitely more useful journalistically—cost a lot to make and didn’t get a ton of attention. Comparatively, Axios on HBO, is cheaper, breaks way more mainstream news, and ties HBO to one of the few online media brand that isn’t currently on fire

A true shame, but it’s really all our faults for expecting more from our monolithic content providers. 

Vice News Sells Spotify Three Podcast Series

Vice News Sells Spotify Three Podcast Series

Vice News Sells Spotify Three Podcast Series

Vice News Sells Spotify Three Podcast Series
Vice News Sells Spotify Three Podcast Series

Elizabeth Warren is now leading the 2020 polls

Elizabeth Warren is now leading the 2020 polls

Elizabeth Warren is now leading the 2020 polls

Elizabeth Warren is now leading the 2020 polls
Elizabeth Warren is now leading the 2020 polls

Video Loss Programming Note 10/5/19

Video Loss Programming Note 10/5/19

Learn How This Project Was Made

Video Loss Programming Note 10/5/19

Video Loss Programming Note 10/5/19

Video Loss Programming Note 10/5/19

After a bit of a personal life hiatus, I’m back! Video Loss is in a somewhat workable state now, and during the hiatus I launched a couple of projects I’d been meaning to finish. The first one, a podcast about anxiety that I made last fall, is now available. I’ve got another one that I’m putting the finishing touches on. It should be up this week.

Meanwhile, I’m hoping to start posting daily on here again. With all the crazy media mergers happening, the specter of impeachment, and an increasingly contested primary, there’s plenty to talk about. Hopefully I can add to the conversations already happening.

I’m feeling good, it’s nice to feel like the backend is built up enough so that I can really focus on the content itself.

Video Loss Programming Note 10/5/19

After a bit of a personal life hiatus, I’m back! Video Loss is in a somewhat workable state now, and during the hiatus I launched a couple of projects I’d been meaning to finish. The first one, a podcast about anxiety that I made last fall, is now available. I’ve got another one that I’m putting the finishing touches on. It should be up this week.

Meanwhile, I’m hoping to start posting daily on here again. With all the crazy media mergers happening, the specter of impeachment, and an increasingly contested primary, there’s plenty to talk about. Hopefully I can add to the conversations already happening.

I’m feeling good, it’s nice to feel like the backend is built up enough so that I can really focus on the content itself.

The merits of The Circus, a show for a broken Washington

The merits of The Circus, a show for a broken Washington

The merits of The Circus, a show for a broken Washington

The merits of The Circus, a show for a broken Washington
The merits of The Circus, a show for a broken Washington

We're Nervous: A Podcast Series About Anxiety and Society

We're Nervous: A Podcast Series About Anxiety and Society

We're Nervous is a podcast about living with anxiety in modern society.

Learn How This Project Was Made

We're Nervous: A Podcast Series About Anxiety and Society

We're Nervous: A Podcast Series About Anxiety and Society

We're Nervous: A Podcast Series About Anxiety and Society
We're Nervous: A Podcast Series About Anxiety and Society

New York Media and Vox desperately want you to think their merger is different

Choreographed rollouts, secrecy, and desperate insecurity define what could be the first Good Media Deal of 2019

New York Media and Vox desperately want you to think their merger is different

Learn How This Project Was Made

Choreographed rollouts, secrecy, and desperate insecurity define what could be the first Good Media Deal of 2019

Choreographed rollouts, secrecy, and desperate insecurity define what could be the first Good Media Deal of 2019

New York Media and Vox desperately want you to think their merger is different

Choreographed rollouts, secrecy, and desperate insecurity define what could be the first Good Media Deal of 2019

New York Media and Vox desperately want you to think their merger is different

New York Media and Vox desperately want you to think their merger is different

Vice News’ post-HBO future comes into focus

Vice News’ post-HBO future comes into focus

Vice News’ post-HBO future comes into focus

Vice News’ post-HBO future comes into focus


Yesterday, Showtime announced that it was picking up Vice’s weekly docuseries, which originally aired on HBO before getting cancelled earlier this year. Despite middling early reviews when it premiered in 2013, the newsmagazine went on to win multiple Emmys throughout its run. The 13-episode seventh season will premiere on Showtime next spring.

A few months after its breakup with its main distributor HBO, Vice is realigning its news division with projects produced with both external partners and other divisions within the company.

  1. This new show on Showtime, which will be a weekly newsmagazine that consists of one to two documentary-style segments an episode.
  2. Vice News Tonight’s relaunch on Vice’s own cable channel Viceland. Vice says it will premiere “soon”, and an absolutely bonkers story from New York Magazine reports that it will cover Viceland’s entire three hour prime time lineup. (The HBO iteration lasted less than a half hour most nights.)
  3. Vice News Dot Com, which recently (and quietly!) got folded into the Vice Dot Com mothership. While Vice News’ content now exists alongside Vice’s other verticals, it continues to expand its original reporting efforts and is in the midst of aggressively staffing up for the 2020 election.
  4. A still unannounced project with Hulu. Originally this show was promoted by Vice leadership to staff as a replacement project for the newsmagazine. An official announcement never came after initial leaks in February, although that recent New York Magazine article confirmed the show was still coming. Presumably, it would be well into production by now. Except an announcement soon.

As a certified Vice News Tonight Stan, this new strategy gives me some amount of optimism. Relying on multiple partners for funding while building out their own internal platforms seems like a winning strategy for a media company with a large audience but shaky financial standing in 2019. While Showtime and Hulu lack the prestige of HBO, they certainly aren’t as unreliable as, say, a Facebook or Twitter. And I’ve been mostly encouraged by Vice’s efforts to rebuild their digital operations under Katie Drummond. (The amount of talent heading to Vice right now is pretty wild.)

The real open question is the show on Viceland. Moving from half an hour to three hours a night without a substantial investment into building the kind of team needed to support that jump is insane. In fact, Vice News Tonight seems to be doing the opposite; star reporters Arielle Duhaime-Ross and Elle Reece have jumped ship to Vox and CNN respectively. (Reeve’s departure is especially painful; her reporting on Charleston was VNT’s one real breakout moment.) New York reports that the expanded lineup may lean heavily into talking heads and roundtables, an easy way to fill up time but an approach vastly less interesting than the old HBO show. All of this is also happening on Viceland, which is (somehow) profitable but completely inconsequential in every other way.

A last note on what this may mean for Vice’s future: an item in Vanity Fair from earlier this summer raised the idea of a CBS/Viacom buyout of Vice. Apparently, Nancy Dubuc (Vice’s new CEO) was immensely interested in the proposition, as were some forces over at CBS, including Shari Redstone. Someone uninterested in the idea was historic Vice skeptic Bob Bakish, the current CEO of Viacom and the incoming leader of a merged CBS-Viacom. That deal hasn’t closed yet, but CBS’s pickup of Vice on Showtime may suggest a newfound willingness on Bakish’s part. At the very least, it means that Dubuc and her New Vice still have supporters at CBS.


Vice News’ post-HBO future comes into focus


Yesterday, Showtime announced that it was picking up Vice’s weekly docuseries, which originally aired on HBO before getting cancelled earlier this year. Despite middling early reviews when it premiered in 2013, the newsmagazine went on to win multiple Emmys throughout its run. The 13-episode seventh season will premiere on Showtime next spring.

A few months after its breakup with its main distributor HBO, Vice is realigning its news division with projects produced with both external partners and other divisions within the company.

  1. This new show on Showtime, which will be a weekly newsmagazine that consists of one to two documentary-style segments an episode.
  2. Vice News Tonight’s relaunch on Vice’s own cable channel Viceland. Vice says it will premiere “soon”, and an absolutely bonkers story from New York Magazine reports that it will cover Viceland’s entire three hour prime time lineup. (The HBO iteration lasted less than a half hour most nights.)
  3. Vice News Dot Com, which recently (and quietly!) got folded into the Vice Dot Com mothership. While Vice News’ content now exists alongside Vice’s other verticals, it continues to expand its original reporting efforts and is in the midst of aggressively staffing up for the 2020 election.
  4. A still unannounced project with Hulu. Originally this show was promoted by Vice leadership to staff as a replacement project for the newsmagazine. An official announcement never came after initial leaks in February, although that recent New York Magazine article confirmed the show was still coming. Presumably, it would be well into production by now. Except an announcement soon.

As a certified Vice News Tonight Stan, this new strategy gives me some amount of optimism. Relying on multiple partners for funding while building out their own internal platforms seems like a winning strategy for a media company with a large audience but shaky financial standing in 2019. While Showtime and Hulu lack the prestige of HBO, they certainly aren’t as unreliable as, say, a Facebook or Twitter. And I’ve been mostly encouraged by Vice’s efforts to rebuild their digital operations under Katie Drummond. (The amount of talent heading to Vice right now is pretty wild.)

The real open question is the show on Viceland. Moving from half an hour to three hours a night without a substantial investment into building the kind of team needed to support that jump is insane. In fact, Vice News Tonight seems to be doing the opposite; star reporters Arielle Duhaime-Ross and Elle Reece have jumped ship to Vox and CNN respectively. (Reeve’s departure is especially painful; her reporting on Charleston was VNT’s one real breakout moment.) New York reports that the expanded lineup may lean heavily into talking heads and roundtables, an easy way to fill up time but an approach vastly less interesting than the old HBO show. All of this is also happening on Viceland, which is (somehow) profitable but completely inconsequential in every other way.

A last note on what this may mean for Vice’s future: an item in Vanity Fair from earlier this summer raised the idea of a CBS/Viacom buyout of Vice. Apparently, Nancy Dubuc (Vice’s new CEO) was immensely interested in the proposition, as were some forces over at CBS, including Shari Redstone. Someone uninterested in the idea was historic Vice skeptic Bob Bakish, the current CEO of Viacom and the incoming leader of a merged CBS-Viacom. That deal hasn’t closed yet, but CBS’s pickup of Vice on Showtime may suggest a newfound willingness on Bakish’s part. At the very least, it means that Dubuc and her New Vice still have supporters at CBS.


It would appear Al Franken is going on a speaking tour

The former Senator from Minnesota is taking another step back into the spotlight

It would appear Al Franken is going on a speaking tour

Learn How This Project Was Made

The former Senator from Minnesota is taking another step back into the spotlight

The former Senator from Minnesota is taking another step back into the spotlight

It would appear Al Franken is going on a speaking tour

The former Senator from Minnesota is taking another step back into the spotlight

It would appear Al Franken is going on a speaking tour

It would appear Al Franken is going on a speaking tour
It would appear Al Franken is going on a speaking tour

America Wasn’t a Democracy, Until Black Americans Made It One

America Wasn’t a Democracy, Until Black Americans Made It One

America Wasn’t a Democracy, Until Black Americans Made It One

America Wasn’t a Democracy, Until Black Americans Made It One

‘Vice News Tonight’ Lands At Viceland Cable Network

‘Vice News Tonight’ Lands At Viceland Cable Network

‘Vice News Tonight’ Lands At Viceland Cable Network

‘Vice News Tonight’ Lands At Viceland Cable Network
‘Vice News Tonight’ Lands At Viceland Cable Network

I don’t care about Anthony Scaramucci ever, and especially now

I don’t care about Anthony Scaramucci ever, and especially now

I don’t care about Anthony Scaramucci ever, and especially now

Driving the news: In a phone interview on Sunday afternoon, Scaramucci compared Trump to a melting nuclear reactor and said he may support a Republican challenger to Trump.

-Jonathan Swan, in an EXCLUSIVE INTERVIEW published on Axios

Granted, in a normal world, it would be noteworthy if a former Administration official publicly condemned the President they served under. 

But we aren’t in normal times and Scaramucci isn’t a normal former Administration official. He’s a dipshit con-artist, who infamously served as Communication Director for eleven days before John Kelly unceremoniously dumped him. His career both pre-and-post White House has been unremarkable. There is little reason to give him space in the news, especially for a EXCLUSIVE interview. 

The President is angry at him on Twitter, sure, but when we are still reeling from two mass shootings, have an administration that has no response to the factors that keep causing mass shootings, and know that Trump loves changing narratives when they don’t suit him, should we really be letting that dictate news judgement? 

Who cares? Why should anyone care? This is stupid. This is a distraction. 

I don’t care about Anthony Scaramucci ever, and especially now

New News

New News

Learn How This Project Was Made

New News

New News

New News
New News

Axios, Vice News Tonight, The Weekly, and the attempted reinvention of television news

The GateHouse-Gannett merger is official

The GateHouse-Gannett merger is official

The GateHouse-Gannett merger is official

The GateHouse-Gannett merger is official
The GateHouse-Gannett merger is official