VIDEO LOSS

a kaleidoscope notebook about politics, the media, and culture
by tom bunting, a Real Journalist

Crisis In Our Backyards

  • How Craigslist Killed The Newspaper
  • Local News Consolidation: Explained
  • A Brief History of How The Internet Changed Journalism
  • How The City Is Covering New York As a Nonprofit
  • Inside The Battle For Better Local News
A short hello

A short hello

Learn How This Project Was Made

A short hello

A short hello

A short hello
March 14, 2019 7:13 PM
Media

I’ve tried to write this post a dozen times. There’s a 2000 word “state of things” post sitting unedited on my computer. I may return to it someday, but until then:

Obviously, things have deteriorated pretty strongly in the three weeks since I last wrote on Video Loss. The Democratic primary appeared to end in the most cynical, depressing way imaginable, and then the entire world went to shit.

This is a weird, unprecedented, and completely horrifying moment in history. I’m not sure where it goes and I’m not sure how long the terror will last. Hopefully, I will be chronicling it all on Video Loss.

Thanks for sticking with me.

A short hello

I’ve tried to write this post a dozen times. There’s a 2000 word “state of things” post sitting unedited on my computer. I may return to it someday, but until then:

Obviously, things have deteriorated pretty strongly in the three weeks since I last wrote on Video Loss. The Democratic primary appeared to end in the most cynical, depressing way imaginable, and then the entire world went to shit.

This is a weird, unprecedented, and completely horrifying moment in history. I’m not sure where it goes and I’m not sure how long the terror will last. Hopefully, I will be chronicling it all on Video Loss.

Thanks for sticking with me.

A short hello

I’ve tried to write this post a dozen times. There’s a 2000 word “state of things” post sitting unedited on my computer. I may return to it someday, but until then:

Obviously, things have deteriorated pretty strongly in the three weeks since I last wrote on Video Loss. The Democratic primary appeared to end in the most cynical, depressing way imaginable, and then the entire world went to shit.

This is a weird, unprecedented, and completely horrifying moment in history. I’m not sure where it goes and I’m not sure how long the terror will last. Hopefully, I will be chronicling it all on Video Loss.

Thanks for sticking with me.

Biden wins really big

Biden wins really big

Learn How This Project Was Made

Biden wins really big

Biden wins really big

Biden wins really big
March 14, 2019 12:55 PM
Politics

Welp, folks, with 100% of the vote in, Joe Biden has decisively won the South Carolina primary. He beat Bernie Sanders by a large margin: 48.4% to 19.9%. He carried every single county. A truly remarkable win for a former frontrunner who desperately, desperately needed it.

Where do things go from here? I’m not entirely sure. Earlier in the day, before the polls closed, Biden told press that “the bigger the win, the bigger the bump” he expects to see in Super Tuesday states. This is clearly a large win, yet a lot of Super Tuesday states have been doing early voting for days or weeks by now; it’s going to be hard for much of a shift in big states like California and Texas to materialize. There’s also the question of the health of Biden’s campaign: press reports have casted doubts on the Biden infrastructure in upcoming states, and it’s widely believed in South Carolina political circles that Biden’s win is credited more to Representative Clyburn’s late endorsement than any messaging or organizing brilliance. (Clyburn, for his part, bluntly told CNN today that Biden’s campaign was “mishandled” and needed retooling.)

So Super Tuesday is likely still going to be a grind for Biden. The lasting impact of tonight will likely be consolidation of moderate support around Biden. The other moderate candidates—namely Buttigieg and Klobuchar—were all destroyed by Biden and will leave the state with few if any delegates. You can’t build a coalition without black support; Sanders also performed badly tonight, but he at least can point to strong support among black voters nationally. I’m not sure if we will see any high-profile dropouts before Super Tuesday, but unless something significantly changes between then and now, I don’t think the other moderates will stick around for much longer. And that’s what I’d be really worried about if I was in Camp Sanders: he’s strongly benefited from a divided moderate field, and there are a number of upcoming states that would be more difficult to win if it was just between him and Biden.

This is all a long-winded way of saying that tonight set the stage for a protracted Sanders-Biden fight, a bitter ideological struggle that may well drag on until the convention in the Summer. There are two wildcards here: Warren and Bloomberg. Bloomberg, coming off two disastrous debate performances and weeks of bad press, looks much less invincible than he did last month. By Tuesday night, we should have some idea of how viable Bloomberg’s bizzare run actually is.

Warren, for reasons that completely elude me, seems content driving a scorched earth path straight to the convention. In her speech tonight, she attacked Sanders—her closest ideological peer—as a political figure that “consistently calls for things he fails to get done, and consistently opposes things he nevertheless fails to stop.” As for future contests, she said “Super Tuesday is three days away and we’re looking forward to gaining as many delegates to the convention as we can,” again openly gesturing to the idea of getting the nomination at a brokered convention, even without winning a single state. It’s an ugly, bizarre twist in her campaign, and it remains to be seen whether this is the last gasps of a failed candidacy or a campaign that’s about to go full Jonestown.

A year ago, before Bloomberg and before four high-profile Senators flamed out and before coronavirus, national polls showed a tight race between Bernie Sanders and Joe Biden. Billions of dollars later, we may be returning to that early dynamic.

Biden wins really big

Welp, folks, with 100% of the vote in, Joe Biden has decisively won the South Carolina primary. He beat Bernie Sanders by a large margin: 48.4% to 19.9%. He carried every single county. A truly remarkable win for a former frontrunner who desperately, desperately needed it.

Where do things go from here? I’m not entirely sure. Earlier in the day, before the polls closed, Biden told press that “the bigger the win, the bigger the bump” he expects to see in Super Tuesday states. This is clearly a large win, yet a lot of Super Tuesday states have been doing early voting for days or weeks by now; it’s going to be hard for much of a shift in big states like California and Texas to materialize. There’s also the question of the health of Biden’s campaign: press reports have casted doubts on the Biden infrastructure in upcoming states, and it’s widely believed in South Carolina political circles that Biden’s win is credited more to Representative Clyburn’s late endorsement than any messaging or organizing brilliance. (Clyburn, for his part, bluntly told CNN today that Biden’s campaign was “mishandled” and needed retooling.)

So Super Tuesday is likely still going to be a grind for Biden. The lasting impact of tonight will likely be consolidation of moderate support around Biden. The other moderate candidates—namely Buttigieg and Klobuchar—were all destroyed by Biden and will leave the state with few if any delegates. You can’t build a coalition without black support; Sanders also performed badly tonight, but he at least can point to strong support among black voters nationally. I’m not sure if we will see any high-profile dropouts before Super Tuesday, but unless something significantly changes between then and now, I don’t think the other moderates will stick around for much longer. And that’s what I’d be really worried about if I was in Camp Sanders: he’s strongly benefited from a divided moderate field, and there are a number of upcoming states that would be more difficult to win if it was just between him and Biden.

This is all a long-winded way of saying that tonight set the stage for a protracted Sanders-Biden fight, a bitter ideological struggle that may well drag on until the convention in the Summer. There are two wildcards here: Warren and Bloomberg. Bloomberg, coming off two disastrous debate performances and weeks of bad press, looks much less invincible than he did last month. By Tuesday night, we should have some idea of how viable Bloomberg’s bizzare run actually is.

Warren, for reasons that completely elude me, seems content driving a scorched earth path straight to the convention. In her speech tonight, she attacked Sanders—her closest ideological peer—as a political figure that “consistently calls for things he fails to get done, and consistently opposes things he nevertheless fails to stop.” As for future contests, she said “Super Tuesday is three days away and we’re looking forward to gaining as many delegates to the convention as we can,” again openly gesturing to the idea of getting the nomination at a brokered convention, even without winning a single state. It’s an ugly, bizarre twist in her campaign, and it remains to be seen whether this is the last gasps of a failed candidacy or a campaign that’s about to go full Jonestown.

A year ago, before Bloomberg and before four high-profile Senators flamed out and before coronavirus, national polls showed a tight race between Bernie Sanders and Joe Biden. Billions of dollars later, we may be returning to that early dynamic.

Biden wins really big

Welp, folks, with 100% of the vote in, Joe Biden has decisively won the South Carolina primary. He beat Bernie Sanders by a large margin: 48.4% to 19.9%. He carried every single county. A truly remarkable win for a former frontrunner who desperately, desperately needed it.

Where do things go from here? I’m not entirely sure. Earlier in the day, before the polls closed, Biden told press that “the bigger the win, the bigger the bump” he expects to see in Super Tuesday states. This is clearly a large win, yet a lot of Super Tuesday states have been doing early voting for days or weeks by now; it’s going to be hard for much of a shift in big states like California and Texas to materialize. There’s also the question of the health of Biden’s campaign: press reports have casted doubts on the Biden infrastructure in upcoming states, and it’s widely believed in South Carolina political circles that Biden’s win is credited more to Representative Clyburn’s late endorsement than any messaging or organizing brilliance. (Clyburn, for his part, bluntly told CNN today that Biden’s campaign was “mishandled” and needed retooling.)

So Super Tuesday is likely still going to be a grind for Biden. The lasting impact of tonight will likely be consolidation of moderate support around Biden. The other moderate candidates—namely Buttigieg and Klobuchar—were all destroyed by Biden and will leave the state with few if any delegates. You can’t build a coalition without black support; Sanders also performed badly tonight, but he at least can point to strong support among black voters nationally. I’m not sure if we will see any high-profile dropouts before Super Tuesday, but unless something significantly changes between then and now, I don’t think the other moderates will stick around for much longer. And that’s what I’d be really worried about if I was in Camp Sanders: he’s strongly benefited from a divided moderate field, and there are a number of upcoming states that would be more difficult to win if it was just between him and Biden.

This is all a long-winded way of saying that tonight set the stage for a protracted Sanders-Biden fight, a bitter ideological struggle that may well drag on until the convention in the Summer. There are two wildcards here: Warren and Bloomberg. Bloomberg, coming off two disastrous debate performances and weeks of bad press, looks much less invincible than he did last month. By Tuesday night, we should have some idea of how viable Bloomberg’s bizzare run actually is.

Warren, for reasons that completely elude me, seems content driving a scorched earth path straight to the convention. In her speech tonight, she attacked Sanders—her closest ideological peer—as a political figure that “consistently calls for things he fails to get done, and consistently opposes things he nevertheless fails to stop.” As for future contests, she said “Super Tuesday is three days away and we’re looking forward to gaining as many delegates to the convention as we can,” again openly gesturing to the idea of getting the nomination at a brokered convention, even without winning a single state. It’s an ugly, bizarre twist in her campaign, and it remains to be seen whether this is the last gasps of a failed candidacy or a campaign that’s about to go full Jonestown.

A year ago, before Bloomberg and before four high-profile Senators flamed out and before coronavirus, national polls showed a tight race between Bernie Sanders and Joe Biden. Billions of dollars later, we may be returning to that early dynamic.

Bloomberg buys three minutes of Sunday night broadcast airtime for “Leadership In Crisis” address

Bloomberg buys three minutes of Sunday night broadcast airtime for “Leadership In Crisis” address

Bloomberg buys three minutes of Sunday night broadcast airtime for “Leadership In Crisis” address

Bloomberg buys three minutes of Sunday night broadcast airtime for “Leadership In Crisis” address
March 14, 2019 12:55 PM
Politics

In a move unprecedented in the last two decades of political campaigning, billionaire Michael Bloomberg is buying three minutes of broadcast television commercial airtime for a speech, his campaign just announced. The pretaped address will focus on the coronavirus, the effect the outbreak is having on the global economy, and the need for “a leader with experience to handle the crisis.”

The speech will air around 8:30pm tomorrow on NBC and CBS simultaneously. That’s a day after South Carolina primary, where moderate rival Joe Biden is expected to dominate, and two days before Super Tuesday, the first real electoral contest for the massive Bloomberg campaign operation.

While Nixon was one of the first candidates to buy airtime for promotional programming all the way back in 1968, Ross Perot pioneered the modern genre of the political informercial during his unsuccessful third-party run in 1992. The fellow billionaire bought 30 minute chunks of prime time airtime to give policy speeches. His rival, Bill Clinton, also bought chunks of local airtime during the primaries to air tightly controlled town halls.

While all modern presidential campaigns reserve small chunks of airtime for 30-60 second ads, it’s unusual to book so much time, especially to address a major domestic crisis.

Bloomberg buys three minutes of Sunday night broadcast airtime for “Leadership In Crisis” address

In a move unprecedented in the last two decades of political campaigning, billionaire Michael Bloomberg is buying three minutes of broadcast television commercial airtime for a speech, his campaign just announced. The pretaped address will focus on the coronavirus, the effect the outbreak is having on the global economy, and the need for “a leader with experience to handle the crisis.”

The speech will air around 8:30pm tomorrow on NBC and CBS simultaneously. That’s a day after South Carolina primary, where moderate rival Joe Biden is expected to dominate, and two days before Super Tuesday, the first real electoral contest for the massive Bloomberg campaign operation.

While Nixon was one of the first candidates to buy airtime for promotional programming all the way back in 1968, Ross Perot pioneered the modern genre of the political informercial during his unsuccessful third-party run in 1992. The fellow billionaire bought 30 minute chunks of prime time airtime to give policy speeches. His rival, Bill Clinton, also bought chunks of local airtime during the primaries to air tightly controlled town halls.

While all modern presidential campaigns reserve small chunks of airtime for 30-60 second ads, it’s unusual to book so much time, especially to address a major domestic crisis.

Bloomberg buys three minutes of Sunday night broadcast airtime for “Leadership In Crisis” address

In a move unprecedented in the last two decades of political campaigning, billionaire Michael Bloomberg is buying three minutes of broadcast television commercial airtime for a speech, his campaign just announced. The pretaped address will focus on the coronavirus, the effect the outbreak is having on the global economy, and the need for “a leader with experience to handle the crisis.”

The speech will air around 8:30pm tomorrow on NBC and CBS simultaneously. That’s a day after South Carolina primary, where moderate rival Joe Biden is expected to dominate, and two days before Super Tuesday, the first real electoral contest for the massive Bloomberg campaign operation.

While Nixon was one of the first candidates to buy airtime for promotional programming all the way back in 1968, Ross Perot pioneered the modern genre of the political informercial during his unsuccessful third-party run in 1992. The fellow billionaire bought 30 minute chunks of prime time airtime to give policy speeches. His rival, Bill Clinton, also bought chunks of local airtime during the primaries to air tightly controlled town halls.

While all modern presidential campaigns reserve small chunks of airtime for 30-60 second ads, it’s unusual to book so much time, especially to address a major domestic crisis.

South Carolina is all about the margins

South Carolina is all about the margins

Learn How This Project Was Made

South Carolina is all about the margins

South Carolina is all about the margins

South Carolina is all about the margins
March 14, 2019 12:55 PM
Politics

Barring some kind of stunner, Joe Biden is going to win today’s South Carolina primary. Bernie Sanders will likely come in second.

This is expected. What is still unknown, and what will likely define the next 72 hours leading into Super Tuesday, is the margin between first and second. Biden, like Clinton in 2016, has staked South Carolina as a firewall state, hoping his connections with the African American community will propel him to victory and demonstrate the diversity of his coalition.

Biden is undeniably in the lead among Black voters. However, unlike Clinton in 2016 and Obama in 2008, he is not running away with this block of voters, and there’s ample evidence that Sanders is gaining steadily on him. The biggest story out of South Carolina, then, is how much Biden wins by; the health of his coalition leading into the diverse Super Tuesday contests.

For some context, here’s how Obama and Clinton did in South Carolina in 2008 and 2016:

2008

  1. Obama (55.4%)
  2. Clinton (26.5%)
  3. Edwards (17.6%)

2016

  1. Clinton (73.44%)
  2. Sanders (26.06%)

Obama and Clinton both decisively won South Carolina, with massive margins over their opponents. With how large the field of candidates still is in 2020, there was never any chance Biden was going to perform as well. But: after three bruising loses in Iowa, New Hampshire, and Nevada, there is a lot of pressure on Biden to perform well here. Donors, endorsers, and the Democratic establishment are all watching this race closely to see how well he does, and the media narrative in the days leading up to Super Tuesday will be shaped by the strength of his victory.

Three possibilities to watch for:

  1. A strong Biden margin (>15 points over Sanders). This would likely lead to a large infusion of donor cash before Super Tuesday, and likely consolidate support around Biden as the viable Sanders alternative.
  2. A narrow victory for Biden (<15 points over Sanders). Good but not spectacular. Somewhat of a reset on the “Sanders domination” narrative, and heightened pressure on Biden to perform well in southern Super Tuesday states. (Where he currently holds narrow leads in most polls and forecasts.)
  3. A surprise Sanders win. Highly unlikely, but it’s almost unimaginable to me that Biden would stay in the race if he lost tonight.

Today is a tone-setter for the next month of the primary: whether this race will become a coronation for Sanders, a drag-out fight between Biden and Sanders, or something in between.

South Carolina is all about the margins

Barring some kind of stunner, Joe Biden is going to win today’s South Carolina primary. Bernie Sanders will likely come in second.

This is expected. What is still unknown, and what will likely define the next 72 hours leading into Super Tuesday, is the margin between first and second. Biden, like Clinton in 2016, has staked South Carolina as a firewall state, hoping his connections with the African American community will propel him to victory and demonstrate the diversity of his coalition.

Biden is undeniably in the lead among Black voters. However, unlike Clinton in 2016 and Obama in 2008, he is not running away with this block of voters, and there’s ample evidence that Sanders is gaining steadily on him. The biggest story out of South Carolina, then, is how much Biden wins by; the health of his coalition leading into the diverse Super Tuesday contests.

For some context, here’s how Obama and Clinton did in South Carolina in 2008 and 2016:

2008

  1. Obama (55.4%)
  2. Clinton (26.5%)
  3. Edwards (17.6%)

2016

  1. Clinton (73.44%)
  2. Sanders (26.06%)

Obama and Clinton both decisively won South Carolina, with massive margins over their opponents. With how large the field of candidates still is in 2020, there was never any chance Biden was going to perform as well. But: after three bruising loses in Iowa, New Hampshire, and Nevada, there is a lot of pressure on Biden to perform well here. Donors, endorsers, and the Democratic establishment are all watching this race closely to see how well he does, and the media narrative in the days leading up to Super Tuesday will be shaped by the strength of his victory.

Three possibilities to watch for:

  1. A strong Biden margin (>15 points over Sanders). This would likely lead to a large infusion of donor cash before Super Tuesday, and likely consolidate support around Biden as the viable Sanders alternative.
  2. A narrow victory for Biden (<15 points over Sanders). Good but not spectacular. Somewhat of a reset on the “Sanders domination” narrative, and heightened pressure on Biden to perform well in southern Super Tuesday states. (Where he currently holds narrow leads in most polls and forecasts.)
  3. A surprise Sanders win. Highly unlikely, but it’s almost unimaginable to me that Biden would stay in the race if he lost tonight.

Today is a tone-setter for the next month of the primary: whether this race will become a coronation for Sanders, a drag-out fight between Biden and Sanders, or something in between.

South Carolina is all about the margins

Barring some kind of stunner, Joe Biden is going to win today’s South Carolina primary. Bernie Sanders will likely come in second.

This is expected. What is still unknown, and what will likely define the next 72 hours leading into Super Tuesday, is the margin between first and second. Biden, like Clinton in 2016, has staked South Carolina as a firewall state, hoping his connections with the African American community will propel him to victory and demonstrate the diversity of his coalition.

Biden is undeniably in the lead among Black voters. However, unlike Clinton in 2016 and Obama in 2008, he is not running away with this block of voters, and there’s ample evidence that Sanders is gaining steadily on him. The biggest story out of South Carolina, then, is how much Biden wins by; the health of his coalition leading into the diverse Super Tuesday contests.

For some context, here’s how Obama and Clinton did in South Carolina in 2008 and 2016:

2008

  1. Obama (55.4%)
  2. Clinton (26.5%)
  3. Edwards (17.6%)

2016

  1. Clinton (73.44%)
  2. Sanders (26.06%)

Obama and Clinton both decisively won South Carolina, with massive margins over their opponents. With how large the field of candidates still is in 2020, there was never any chance Biden was going to perform as well. But: after three bruising loses in Iowa, New Hampshire, and Nevada, there is a lot of pressure on Biden to perform well here. Donors, endorsers, and the Democratic establishment are all watching this race closely to see how well he does, and the media narrative in the days leading up to Super Tuesday will be shaped by the strength of his victory.

Three possibilities to watch for:

  1. A strong Biden margin (>15 points over Sanders). This would likely lead to a large infusion of donor cash before Super Tuesday, and likely consolidate support around Biden as the viable Sanders alternative.
  2. A narrow victory for Biden (<15 points over Sanders). Good but not spectacular. Somewhat of a reset on the “Sanders domination” narrative, and heightened pressure on Biden to perform well in southern Super Tuesday states. (Where he currently holds narrow leads in most polls and forecasts.)
  3. A surprise Sanders win. Highly unlikely, but it’s almost unimaginable to me that Biden would stay in the race if he lost tonight.

Today is a tone-setter for the next month of the primary: whether this race will become a coronation for Sanders, a drag-out fight between Biden and Sanders, or something in between.

Warren’s path to victory would doom the Democratic Party

No one wins in a contested convention

Warren’s path to victory would doom the Democratic Party

Learn How This Project Was Made

No one wins in a contested convention

No one wins in a contested convention

Warren’s path to victory would doom the Democratic Party

No one wins in a contested convention

Warren’s path to victory would doom the Democratic Party

Warren’s path to victory would doom the Democratic Party
March 14, 2019 12:55 PM
Politics
Warren’s path to victory would doom the Democratic Party
Warren’s path to victory would doom the Democratic Party

Warren at risk of losing her home state

Warren at risk of losing her home state

Learn How This Project Was Made

Warren at risk of losing her home state

Warren at risk of losing her home state

Warren at risk of losing her home state
March 14, 2019 12:55 PM
Politics
Warren at risk of losing her home state
Warren at risk of losing her home state

Donald Trump, Bernie Bro

Donald Trump, Bernie Bro

Learn How This Project Was Made

Donald Trump, Bernie Bro

Donald Trump, Bernie Bro

Donald Trump, Bernie Bro
March 14, 2019 12:55 PM
Politics
Donald Trump, Bernie Bro
Donald Trump, Bernie Bro

Opinion | No, Not Sanders, Not Ever

Opinion | No, Not Sanders, Not Ever

Learn How This Project Was Made

Opinion | No, Not Sanders, Not Ever

Opinion | No, Not Sanders, Not Ever

Opinion | No, Not Sanders, Not Ever
March 14, 2019 7:13 PM
Media
Opinion | No, Not Sanders, Not Ever
Opinion | No, Not Sanders, Not Ever

Democratic Leaders Willing to Risk Party Damage to Stop Bernie Sanders

Democratic Leaders Willing to Risk Party Damage to Stop Bernie Sanders

Democratic Leaders Willing to Risk Party Damage to Stop Bernie Sanders

Democratic Leaders Willing to Risk Party Damage to Stop Bernie Sanders
Democratic Leaders Willing to Risk Party Damage to Stop Bernie Sanders

Joe Biden's campaign isn't dead yet

Joe Biden's campaign isn't dead yet

Learn How This Project Was Made

Joe Biden's campaign isn't dead yet

Joe Biden's campaign isn't dead yet

Joe Biden's campaign isn't dead yet
March 14, 2019 12:55 PM
Politics
Joe Biden's campaign isn't dead yet
Joe Biden's campaign isn't dead yet

Gawker’s murderer is now suing the New York Times for the President

Gawker’s murderer is now suing the New York Times for the President

Gawker’s murderer is now suing the New York Times for the President

Gawker’s murderer is now suing the New York Times for the President
March 14, 2019 12:55 PM
Politics

Gawker’s murderer is now suing the New York Times for the President

Today, the Donald Trump Presidential campaign filed a suit against The New York Times, claiming that the newspaper knowingly published false information about the President.

The lawsuit hinges on an opinion article written by Max Frankel, which stated that Putin “had an overarching deal” with the Trump campaign during the 2016 election. Trump’s team claims this was an intentional effort by the Times to misinform their readers to get Trump out of office, which....seems like a reach.

Of course, whether or not this is a winnable case isn’t the point: the Trump campaign is trying to draw blood from the Times to demonstrate strength leading into the 2020 election. And the man leading that charge is none other than Charles Harder, the authoritarian lawyer responsible for the infamous lawsuit that brought down Gawker four years ago.

After the victorious lawsuit against Gawker—which was secretly funded by a billionaire with the explicit goal of destroying the media organization—Harder has taken his brand of press censoring litigation to the President. This marks the latest escalation in Trump and Harder’s war against the press.

Keep this information in mind when you see the mainstream response to this news. There will inevitably be many Reasonable People yelling about this fragrant attack on the free press. Many of them cheered on the demise of Gawker; or at least attempted to minimize its impact.

Their lack of foresight helped normalize Harder, and led us to this point.

Gawker’s murderer is now suing the New York Times for the President

Gawker’s murderer is now suing the New York Times for the President

Today, the Donald Trump Presidential campaign filed a suit against The New York Times, claiming that the newspaper knowingly published false information about the President.

The lawsuit hinges on an opinion article written by Max Frankel, which stated that Putin “had an overarching deal” with the Trump campaign during the 2016 election. Trump’s team claims this was an intentional effort by the Times to misinform their readers to get Trump out of office, which....seems like a reach.

Of course, whether or not this is a winnable case isn’t the point: the Trump campaign is trying to draw blood from the Times to demonstrate strength leading into the 2020 election. And the man leading that charge is none other than Charles Harder, the authoritarian lawyer responsible for the infamous lawsuit that brought down Gawker four years ago.

After the victorious lawsuit against Gawker—which was secretly funded by a billionaire with the explicit goal of destroying the media organization—Harder has taken his brand of press censoring litigation to the President. This marks the latest escalation in Trump and Harder’s war against the press.

Keep this information in mind when you see the mainstream response to this news. There will inevitably be many Reasonable People yelling about this fragrant attack on the free press. Many of them cheered on the demise of Gawker; or at least attempted to minimize its impact.

Their lack of foresight helped normalize Harder, and led us to this point.

Gawker’s murderer is now suing the New York Times for the President

Gawker’s murderer is now suing the New York Times for the President

Today, the Donald Trump Presidential campaign filed a suit against The New York Times, claiming that the newspaper knowingly published false information about the President.

The lawsuit hinges on an opinion article written by Max Frankel, which stated that Putin “had an overarching deal” with the Trump campaign during the 2016 election. Trump’s team claims this was an intentional effort by the Times to misinform their readers to get Trump out of office, which....seems like a reach.

Of course, whether or not this is a winnable case isn’t the point: the Trump campaign is trying to draw blood from the Times to demonstrate strength leading into the 2020 election. And the man leading that charge is none other than Charles Harder, the authoritarian lawyer responsible for the infamous lawsuit that brought down Gawker four years ago.

After the victorious lawsuit against Gawker—which was secretly funded by a billionaire with the explicit goal of destroying the media organization—Harder has taken his brand of press censoring litigation to the President. This marks the latest escalation in Trump and Harder’s war against the press.

Keep this information in mind when you see the mainstream response to this news. There will inevitably be many Reasonable People yelling about this fragrant attack on the free press. Many of them cheered on the demise of Gawker; or at least attempted to minimize its impact.

Their lack of foresight helped normalize Harder, and led us to this point.

Barring any surprises, Joe Biden will win Saturday’s primary in South Carolina

Barring any surprises, Joe Biden will win Saturday’s primary in South Carolina

Barring any surprises, Joe Biden will win Saturday’s primary in South Carolina

Barring any surprises, Joe Biden will win Saturday’s primary in South Carolina
March 14, 2019 12:55 PM
Politics

Today’s endorsement of Joe Biden by South Carolina “kingmaker” James Clyburn reinstates the obvious: Biden will likely win the South Carolina primary.

Biden leads in most polls, even in polling done after Sander’s overwhelming win in Nevada last week. His campaign has spent months building an operation in the state. The majority black voting demographics work out favorably for Biden, who traditionally leads with Black Americans. Biden put in a a strong debate performance last night; his primary rival for the moderate lane in the state, billionaire Tom Steyer, did not.

There are two likely scenarios for Saturday: a strong Biden win and a weak Biden win. A strong, decisive victory over Bernie Sanders would likely propel Biden into Super Tuesday with a momentum narrative, which could boost his performance in the southern states where he needs to win to limit Sander’s delegate lead. A weak win may stifle that energy a bit, but would certainly not be as disastrous as a close loss to Sanders.

Whether a win on Saturday will be enough to halt Sanders remains to be seen; the delegate math, press narrative, and polling trends remain strongly in the Vermont Senator’s favor. Yet a Biden win in South Carolina will keep this a competitive race, one that will likely drag on for weeks still.

Barring any surprises, Joe Biden will win Saturday’s primary in South Carolina

Today’s endorsement of Joe Biden by South Carolina “kingmaker” James Clyburn reinstates the obvious: Biden will likely win the South Carolina primary.

Biden leads in most polls, even in polling done after Sander’s overwhelming win in Nevada last week. His campaign has spent months building an operation in the state. The majority black voting demographics work out favorably for Biden, who traditionally leads with Black Americans. Biden put in a a strong debate performance last night; his primary rival for the moderate lane in the state, billionaire Tom Steyer, did not.

There are two likely scenarios for Saturday: a strong Biden win and a weak Biden win. A strong, decisive victory over Bernie Sanders would likely propel Biden into Super Tuesday with a momentum narrative, which could boost his performance in the southern states where he needs to win to limit Sander’s delegate lead. A weak win may stifle that energy a bit, but would certainly not be as disastrous as a close loss to Sanders.

Whether a win on Saturday will be enough to halt Sanders remains to be seen; the delegate math, press narrative, and polling trends remain strongly in the Vermont Senator’s favor. Yet a Biden win in South Carolina will keep this a competitive race, one that will likely drag on for weeks still.

Barring any surprises, Joe Biden will win Saturday’s primary in South Carolina

Today’s endorsement of Joe Biden by South Carolina “kingmaker” James Clyburn reinstates the obvious: Biden will likely win the South Carolina primary.

Biden leads in most polls, even in polling done after Sander’s overwhelming win in Nevada last week. His campaign has spent months building an operation in the state. The majority black voting demographics work out favorably for Biden, who traditionally leads with Black Americans. Biden put in a a strong debate performance last night; his primary rival for the moderate lane in the state, billionaire Tom Steyer, did not.

There are two likely scenarios for Saturday: a strong Biden win and a weak Biden win. A strong, decisive victory over Bernie Sanders would likely propel Biden into Super Tuesday with a momentum narrative, which could boost his performance in the southern states where he needs to win to limit Sander’s delegate lead. A weak win may stifle that energy a bit, but would certainly not be as disastrous as a close loss to Sanders.

Whether a win on Saturday will be enough to halt Sanders remains to be seen; the delegate math, press narrative, and polling trends remain strongly in the Vermont Senator’s favor. Yet a Biden win in South Carolina will keep this a competitive race, one that will likely drag on for weeks still.

On the debate stage, the implosion of Mike 2020 and another setback for Never Sanders democrats

At the angriest debate yet, Mike Bloomberg gets owned, Elizabeth Warren sets the stage on fire, and Bernie Sanders soldiers on

On the debate stage, the implosion of Mike 2020 and another setback for Never Sanders democrats

Learn How This Project Was Made

At the angriest debate yet, Mike Bloomberg gets owned, Elizabeth Warren sets the stage on fire, and Bernie Sanders soldiers on

At the angriest debate yet, Mike Bloomberg gets owned, Elizabeth Warren sets the stage on fire, and Bernie Sanders soldiers on

On the debate stage, the implosion of Mike 2020 and another setback for Never Sanders democrats

At the angriest debate yet, Mike Bloomberg gets owned, Elizabeth Warren sets the stage on fire, and Bernie Sanders soldiers on

On the debate stage, the implosion of Mike 2020 and another setback for Never Sanders democrats

The fire rises

This week’s State of the Race: a grim contest between Sanders and Bloomberg

The fire rises

Learn How This Project Was Made

This week’s State of the Race: a grim contest between Sanders and Bloomberg

This week’s State of the Race: a grim contest between Sanders and Bloomberg

The fire rises

This week’s State of the Race: a grim contest between Sanders and Bloomberg

The fire rises

The fire rises
March 14, 2019 12:55 PM
Politics
The fire rises
The fire rises

Vice News Tonight is officially relaunching on March 4th

Vice News Tonight is officially relaunching on March 4th

Vice News Tonight is officially relaunching on March 4th

Vice News Tonight is officially relaunching on March 4th
March 14, 2019 7:13 PM
Media

Variety is reporting that Vice will relaunch its nightly newscast, Vice News Tonight, on March 4th. It’ll air Monday through Thursday at 8PM on VICE TV. The show previously aired for three years on HBO, before it was cancelled last year.

Following the departure of Vice News chief Josh Tyrangiel and Executive Producer Madeleine Haeringer, this new iteration will be run by MSNBC veteran Nikki Egan. The show will run for an hour—twice as long as it did on HBO—and include live in-studio segments in addition to the field pieces VNT is commonly known for.

After a year of uncertainty, Vice News is establishing its post-HBO future. The organization is focusing on projects funded by partners, building out its online presence, and serving as the centerpiece of the relaunched Vice TV cable channel. Formerly known as Viceland, the struggling network is pivoting from lifestyle content to news coverage.

We broke the story of Vice TV’s rebranding earlier this year. (Someone should tell AdAge.)

Vice News Tonight is officially relaunching on March 4th

Variety is reporting that Vice will relaunch its nightly newscast, Vice News Tonight, on March 4th. It’ll air Monday through Thursday at 8PM on VICE TV. The show previously aired for three years on HBO, before it was cancelled last year.

Following the departure of Vice News chief Josh Tyrangiel and Executive Producer Madeleine Haeringer, this new iteration will be run by MSNBC veteran Nikki Egan. The show will run for an hour—twice as long as it did on HBO—and include live in-studio segments in addition to the field pieces VNT is commonly known for.

After a year of uncertainty, Vice News is establishing its post-HBO future. The organization is focusing on projects funded by partners, building out its online presence, and serving as the centerpiece of the relaunched Vice TV cable channel. Formerly known as Viceland, the struggling network is pivoting from lifestyle content to news coverage.

We broke the story of Vice TV’s rebranding earlier this year. (Someone should tell AdAge.)

Vice News Tonight is officially relaunching on March 4th

Variety is reporting that Vice will relaunch its nightly newscast, Vice News Tonight, on March 4th. It’ll air Monday through Thursday at 8PM on VICE TV. The show previously aired for three years on HBO, before it was cancelled last year.

Following the departure of Vice News chief Josh Tyrangiel and Executive Producer Madeleine Haeringer, this new iteration will be run by MSNBC veteran Nikki Egan. The show will run for an hour—twice as long as it did on HBO—and include live in-studio segments in addition to the field pieces VNT is commonly known for.

After a year of uncertainty, Vice News is establishing its post-HBO future. The organization is focusing on projects funded by partners, building out its online presence, and serving as the centerpiece of the relaunched Vice TV cable channel. Formerly known as Viceland, the struggling network is pivoting from lifestyle content to news coverage.

We broke the story of Vice TV’s rebranding earlier this year. (Someone should tell AdAge.)

Joe Biden’s invincibility myth is shattered

Biden’s defeat in Iowa was years in the making

Joe Biden’s invincibility myth is shattered

Learn How This Project Was Made

Biden’s defeat in Iowa was years in the making

Biden’s defeat in Iowa was years in the making

Joe Biden’s invincibility myth is shattered

Biden’s defeat in Iowa was years in the making

Joe Biden’s invincibility myth is shattered

Joe Biden’s invincibility myth is shattered
March 14, 2019 12:55 PM
Politics
Joe Biden’s invincibility myth is shattered
Joe Biden’s invincibility myth is shattered

Iowa will never end

Iowa will never end

Learn How This Project Was Made

Iowa will never end

Iowa will never end

Iowa will never end
March 14, 2019 12:55 PM
Politics

Image

This is the water.

And this is the well.

Drink full and descend.

The horse is the white of the eyes and dark within.

This is the water.

And this is the well.

Drink full and descend.

The horse is the white of the eyes and dark within.

This is the water.

And this is the well.

Iowa will never end

Image

This is the water.

And this is the well.

Drink full and descend.

The horse is the white of the eyes and dark within.

This is the water.

And this is the well.

Drink full and descend.

The horse is the white of the eyes and dark within.

This is the water.

And this is the well.

Iowa will never end

Image

This is the water.

And this is the well.

Drink full and descend.

The horse is the white of the eyes and dark within.

This is the water.

And this is the well.

Drink full and descend.

The horse is the white of the eyes and dark within.

This is the water.

And this is the well.

Protocol: New tech publication from POLITICO publisher

Protocol: New tech publication from POLITICO publisher

Protocol: New tech publication from POLITICO publisher

Protocol: New tech publication from POLITICO publisher
Tim Grieve/Protocol
March 14, 2019 7:13 PM
Technology
Interested to see what the Politico take on tech looks like.
Protocol: New tech publication from POLITICO publisher
Protocol: New tech publication from POLITICO publisher

Smart Brevity, Not Informational Density

The Axios redesign makes some Choices

Smart Brevity, Not Informational Density

Learn How This Project Was Made

The Axios redesign makes some Choices

The Axios redesign makes some Choices

Smart Brevity, Not Informational Density

The Axios redesign makes some Choices

Smart Brevity, Not Informational Density

Smart Brevity, Not Informational Density
March 14, 2019 7:13 PM
Media
Smart Brevity, Not Informational Density
Smart Brevity, Not Informational Density